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Article ID: 557775

New Park Protects Tigers, Elephants and Carbon

Wildlife Conservation Society

The government of Cambodia has transformed a former logging concession into a new, Yosemite-sized protected area that safeguards not only threatened primates, tigers, and elephants, but also massive stores of carbon according to the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which worked closely with governmental agencies to help create the protected area.

Released:
22-Oct-2009 11:55 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    27-Aug-2009 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 555565

Scientists Uncover Solar Cycle, Stratosphere, and Ocean Connections

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Subtle connections between the 11-year solar cycle, the stratosphere, and the tropical Pacific Ocean work in sync to generate periodic weather patterns that affect much of the globe, according to research appearing this week in the journal Science.

Released:
25-Aug-2009 9:00 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Aug-2009 8:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 555445

Ocean Warming May Increase the Abundance of Marine Consumers

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Warmer ocean temperatures could mean dramatic shifts in the structure of underwater food webs and the abundance of marine life, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Released:
20-Aug-2009 4:00 PM EDT
vandeveer.jpg

Article ID: 555431

Professor Available to Discuss the Politics of Environmental Policymaking

University of New Hampshire

Stacy VanDeveer, associate professor of political science at the University of New Hampshire, is available to discuss the complexities and contradictions regarding climate policy in North America, and the politics of U.S.-EU energy and environmental policymaking.

Released:
21-Aug-2009 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 555442

Cleaning Up Black Carbon Provides Instant Benefits Against Global Warming

University of California San Diego

The world could buy time to forestall disastrous environmental and geopolitical climate change effects by using existing technologies to curb emissions created through diesel and solid biomass fuel burning, according to an article co-authored by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego climate and atmospheric scientist V. Ramanathan.

Released:
20-Aug-2009 3:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 555361

New Spout Nearly Doubles Maple Production, Has 1 Million Advance Orders

University of Vermont

An innovative new spout developed by the University of Vermont for the maple industry will increase production by up to 90 percent, by preventing a tree's tap hole from becoming contaminated with bacteria. It will also mitigate the effects of global warming, which is shortening the sugaring season.

Released:
19-Aug-2009 6:00 AM EDT
Lrg_snow_survey2.jpg

Article ID: 550677

Report Presents New Research on Climate Change Effects in California

University of California San Diego

Scripps researchers contribute to assessment concluding that loss of agricultural land, increased risk of wildfires among potential outcomes.

Released:
1-Apr-2009 1:20 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jan-2009 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 548192

Survey: Scientists Agree Human-Induced Global Warming is Real

University of Illinois at Chicago

A broad poll of experts taken by UIC earth scientist Peter Doran finds that the vast majority of climatologists and other earth scientists believe in global warming and think human activity is a factor for the temperature rise. It dispels lingering doubts by some of a consensus among the scientists.

Released:
16-Jan-2009 4:45 PM EST

Article ID: 546781

Global Warming Is Changing Organic Matter in Soil

University of Toronto

New research shows that we should be looking to the ground, not the sky, to see where climate change could have its most perilous impact on life on Earth.

Released:
24-Nov-2008 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 544633

Severe Climate Change Costs Forecast for Pa., N.C., Tenn., N.D.

University of Maryland, College Park

College Park, Md. - The economic impact of climate change will cost a number of U.S. states billions of dollars, and delaying action will raise the price tag, concludes the latest series of reports produced by the University of Maryland's Center for Integrative Environmental Research (CIER). The new reports project specific long-term direct and ripple economic effects on North Carolina, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. In most cases, the price tag could run into billions of dollars.

Released:
24-Sep-2008 12:15 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy


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