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Meteors, photoacoustic effect

Origin of Spooky Meteor Noises Reappraised by Sandia Researchers

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Sound travels more slowly than light. Then why do sounds of meteors entering earth's atmosphere precede or accompany the sight of them? Sandia researchers believe they have an answer.

Science

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Oceanography, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, Public Health, Ozone, Ozone Pollution, Air Pollution, University of Washington

'The Blob' of Abnormal Conditions Boosted Western U.S. Ozone Levels

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Abnormal conditions in the northeast Pacific Ocean, nicknamed “the blob,” put ozone levels in June 2015 higher than normal over a large swath of the Western U.S.

Science

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Solar Nebula, solar system formation, solar system evolution, Planet Formation, Magnetism

Scientists Estimate Solar Nebula's Lifetime

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A collaborative study involving Brookhaven, MIT, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro suggests the gas cloud from which our solar system formed lasted about 4 million years.

Science

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Pterosaur, dinosaur discovery

Giant Flying Reptile Ruled Ancient Transylvania

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The creature has a considerably shorter and stronger neck with larger muscles than the long graceful necks of others in its species.

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Largest Undersea Landslide Revealed on the Great Barrier Reef

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James Cook University scientists have helped discover the remnants of a massive undersea landslide on the Great Barrier Reef.

Medicine

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Super Bug, MRSA, Mrsa Infections, Drug Development, Drug Discovery, Marine Organisms, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute

Compound from Deep-Water Marine Sponge Could Provide Antibacterial Solutions for MRSA

A compound extracted from a deep-water marine sponge collected near the Bahamas is showing potent antibacterial activity against the drug resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also called the “super bug.”

Science

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carnivorous plants, genome assemblies, Genome, pitcher plant, Biology (Genetics), Biology (Ecology/Environment)

Study Sheds Light on How Carnivorous Plants Acquired a Taste for Meat

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A new study probes the origins of carnivory in several distantly related plants — including the Australian, Asian and American pitcher plants, which appear strikingly similar to the human (or insect) eye.

Science

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Fast Food Wrapper, perfluorinated chemicals, Pfcs, polyfluoroalkyl substances, PFASs

New Study Finds Extensive Use of Fluorinated Chemicals in Fast Food Wrappers

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Previous studies have linked the chemicals to kidney and testicular cancers, thyroid disease, low birth weight and immunotoxicity in children, among other health issues.

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East China Sea, algal blooms, factory emissions, Katherine Mackey

Increasing Factory and Auto Emissions Disrupt Natural Cycle in East China Sea

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China’s rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations.

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UNH Research Finds White Mountain National Forest Home to Nearly 140 Species of Bees

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The White Mountain National Forest is home to nearly 140 species of native bees, including two species of native bumble bees that are in decline in the Northeast, according to researchers with the University of New Hampshire who recently completed the first assessment of the state’s native bee population in the national forest.

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Great White Shark , Great Hammerhead Shark, Cornell University, Nova Southeastern University, The College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, Save our Seas Shark Research Center, Save Our Seas Foundation, NSU Guy Harvey Research Institute, Mahmood Shivji, Michael Stanhope

Sharks Show Novel Changes in Their Immune Cancer-Related Genes

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Research scientists at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) have been studying the genetics of great white and great hammerhead sharks, and their work brings us a few steps closer to understanding – from a genetic sense – why sharks exhibit some characteristics that are highly desirable by humans (specifically, rapid wound healing and possible higher resistance to cancers.)

Science

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Paleobiology, Megafaunal extinction, Australia, Climate Change, Global Warming, Paleontology

Climate Change Helped Kill Off Super-Sized Ice Age Animals in Australia

Changes in the diets of the super-sized megafauna that ruled Australia during the last Ice Age indicate that climate change was a major factor in their extinction.

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Earth, moon, isotopic analysis

Isotopic Similarities Seen in Materials That Formed Earth, Moon

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Where did the materials that make up the Earth and moon come from—and when did they arrive?

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Dr. Nir Sapir, University Of Haifa, Insect Migration

New Study Reveals That Insects Also Migrate

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The researchers found that insects engage in the largest continental migration on earth. Some 3.5 trillion insects in Southern Britain alone migrate each year – a biomass eight times that of bird migration.

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Plate Techtonics, Mid Ocean Ridges, East Pacific Rise

Heat From Earth’s Core Could Be Underlying Force in Plate Tectonics

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For decades, scientists have theorized that the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates is driven largely by negative buoyancy created as they cool. New research, however, shows plate dynamics are driven significantly by the additional force of heat drawn from the Earth’s core. The new findings also challenge the theory that underwater mountain ranges known as mid-ocean ridges are passive boundaries between moving plates. The findings show the East Pacific Rise, the Earth’s dominant mid-ocean ridge, is dynamic as heat is transferred.

Science

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Genomics, Environment, Antarctic, Ocean, Diatoms, Evolution, Ecosystem, Genetics, Phytoplankton, Adaptation, Eukaryotes, eukaryotic biology, Population Genetics

Tracking Antarctic Adaptations in Diatoms

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An international team of researchers conducted a comparative genomic analysis to gain insights into the genome structure and evolution of the diatom Fragillariopsis cylindrus, as well as its role in the Southern Ocean.

Science

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Anthropology, acheology, Bering Strait, human settlements, Yukon, Radiocarbon, PLoS ONE, Montreal

The First Humans Arrived in North America a Lot Earlier Than Believed

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Anthropologists at Université de Montréal have dated the oldest human settlement in Canada back 10,000 years.

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Diversification Key to Resilient Fishing Communities

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Fishing communities can survive ― and even thrive ― as fish abundance and market prices shift if they can catch a variety of species and nimbly move from one fishery to the next, a new University of Washington study finds.

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Earthquakes, Tonga Trench, hydrous minerals, wastewater injection, intermediate-depth earthquakes

Release of Water Shakes Pacific Plate at Depth

A team of seismologists analyzing the data from 671 earthquakes that occurred between 30 and 280 miles beneath the Earth's surface in the Pacific Plate as it descended into the Tonga Trench were surprised to find a zone of intense earthquake activity in the downgoing slab. The pattern of the activity along the slab provided strong evidence that the earthquakes are sparked by the release of water at depth.

Science

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, HD 172555, exocomets, STAR

Hubble Detects 'Exocomets' Taking the Plunge Into a Young Star

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Interstellar forecast for a nearby star: Raining comets! The comets are plunging into the star HD 172555, which resides 95 light-years from Earth. The comets were not seen directly around the star. Astronomers inferred their presence when they used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to detect gas that is likely the vaporized remnants of their icy nuclei.







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