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Antarctic Fossils Reveal Creatures Weren't Safer in the South During Dinosaur Extinction

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A study of more than 6,000 marine fossils from the Antarctic shows that the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs was sudden and just as deadly to life in the polar regions.

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How a Huge Landslide Shaped Zion National Park

A Utah mountainside collapsed 4,800 years ago in a gargantuan landslide known as a “rock avalanche,” creating the flat floor of what is now Zion National Park by damming the Virgin River to create a lake that existed for 700 years.

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Spring Snow a No-Go?

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Spring snowpack, relied on by ski resorts and water managers throughout the Western United States, may be more vulnerable to a warming climate in coming decades, according to a new University of Utah study.

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Tiny Vampires

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Paleobiologist Susannah Porter finds evidence of predation in ancient microbial ecosystems dating back more than 740 million years.

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Supermassive Black Holes in 'Red Geyser' Galaxies Cause Galactic Warming

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An international team of scientists, including the University of Kentucky's Renbin Yan, is solving one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in galaxy evolution.

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A 100 Million-Year Partnership on the Brink of Extinction

A symbiotic relationship that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs is at risk of ending, as habitat loss and environmental change mean that a species of Australian crayfish and the tiny worms that depend on them are both at serious risk of extinction.

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Spring Comes Sooner to Urban Heat Islands, with Potential Consequences for Wildlife

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With spring now fully sprung, a new study by University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers shows that buds burst earlier in dense urban areas than in their suburban and rural surroundings. This may be music to urban gardeners’ ears, but that tune could be alarming to some native and migratory birds and bugs.

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New Research Confirms Continued, Unabated and Large-Scale Amphibian Declines

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New U.S. Geological Survey-led research suggests that even though amphibians are severely declining worldwide, there is no smoking gun - and thus no simple solution - to halting or reversing these declines.

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Great Apes Communicate Cooperatively

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Gestural communication in bonobos and chimpanzees shows turn-taking and clearly distinguishable communication styles.

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Strange Sea-Dwelling Reptile Fossil Hints at Rapid Evolution After Mass Extinction

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Two hundred and fifty million years ago, life on earth was in a tail-spin--climate change, volcanic eruptions, and rising sea levels contributed to a mass extinction that makes the death of the dinosaurs look like child's play. Marine life got hit hardest--96% of all marine species went extinct. For a long time, scientists believed that the early marine reptiles that came about after the mass extinction evolved slowly, but the recent discovery of a strange new fossil brings that view into question.

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Call to Minimise Drone Impact on Wildlife

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University of Adelaide environmental researchers have called for a ‘code of best practice’ in using unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) for wildlife monitoring and protection, and other biological field research.

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Squids on the Rise as Oceans Change

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Unlike the declining populations of many fish species, the number of cephalopods (octopus, cuttlefish and squid) has increased in the world’s oceans over the past 60 years, a University of Adelaide study has found.

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ESF Lists Top 10 New Species for 2016

A hominin in the same genus as humans and an ape nicknamed “Laia” are among the discoveries identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry as the Top 10 New Species for 2016. Also on the list are a giant Galapagos tortoise, a seadragon, an anglerfish, three invertebrates, a carnivorous sundew and a small tree.

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Rapid Rise of the Mesozoic Sea Dragons

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In the Mesozoic, the time of the dinosaurs, from 252 to 66 million years ago, marine reptiles such as ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs were top predators in the oceans. But their origins and early rise to dominance have been somewhat mysterious.

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Man-Eating Monster Crocodile May Be Florida’s Newest Invasive Species

Spotting native alligators and crocodiles in Florida is common, but anyone who sees a large reptile may want to take a second look -- man-eaters that can grow to 18 feet long and weigh as much as a small car have been found in the Sunshine State.

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Ancient Tsunami Evidence on Mars Reveals Life Potential

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The geologic shape of what were once shorelines through Mars’ northern plains convinces scientists that two large meteorites – hitting the planet millions of years apart – triggered a pair of mega-tsunamis. These gigantic waves forever scarred the Martian landscape and yielded evidence of cold, salty oceans conducive to sustaining life.

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New Study Finds Major Earthquake Threat From the Riasi Fault in the Himalayas

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New geologic mapping in the Himalayan mountains of Kashmir between Pakistan and India suggests that the region is ripe for a major earthquake that could endanger the lives of as many as a million people.

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Future Solar Cells Could Be Based on Iron Molecules

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have successfully explained how iron-based dyes work on a molecular level in solar cells. The new findings will accelerate the development of inexpensive and environmentally friendly solar cells.

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Squeezing Out Mountains, Mathematically, on Jupiter’s Moon Io

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Mountains aren’t the first thing that hit you when you look at images of Jupiter’s innermost moon, Io. But once you absorb the fact that the moon is slathered in sulfurous lava erupted from 400 active volcanoes, you might turn your attention to scattered bumps and lumps that turn out, on closer inspection, to be Io’s version of mountains.

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‘Virtual Partner’ Elicits Emotional Responses From a Human Partner in Real-Time

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“How does it ‘feel’ to interact behaviorally with a machine?” To answer that, scientists created a virtual partner that can elicit emotional responses from its human partner while the pair engages in behavioral coordination in real-time. The virtual partner’s behavior is governed by mathematical models of human-to-human interactions in a way that enables humans to interact with the mathematical description of their social selves. Humans showed greater emotional arousal when they thought the virtual partner was a human and not a machine, although in all cases, they were interacting with a machine.