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Caught in the Act: UW Astronomers Find a Rare Supernova ‘Impostor’ in a Nearby Galaxy

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UW astronomers Breanna Binder and Ben Williams have identified a rare type of 'supernova impostor' in a nearby galaxy, with implications for how scientists look at the short, complex lives of massive stars.

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New Study Confirms Giant Flightless Bird Wandered the Arctic 50 Million Years Ago

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A single toe bone found on Ellesmere Island in the 1970s is described for the first time.

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Rare Beluga Data Show Whales Dive to Maximize Meals

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As the Arctic continues to change due to rising temperatures, melting sea ice and human interest in developing oil and shipping routes, it’s important to understand belugas’ baseline behavior, argue the authors of a new paper.

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Queen’s Scientists on the Hunt for Source of Gravitational Waves

Yesterday saw the announcement of the discovery of gravitational waves by LIGO, in what is being described as the most important breakthrough in physics for decades. Now scientists from Queen’s University Belfast are leading the hunt for the source of these ripples in space.

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Clues About Human Migration to Imperial Rome Uncovered in 2,000-Year-Old Cemetery

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Ancient immigrants to Rome included young children, men.

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A Surprise Role for Dopamine in Social Interplay

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Scientists have shown that the chemical signal dopamine plays an unexpected role in social interactions. In mice, nerve cells in the brain that release dopamine became particularly active in animals kept on their own for a short time.

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Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years After Einstein’s Prediction

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For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. A UAH researcher was at the center of action.

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Plankton Communities Key to Carbon Reaching Safe Resting Spot, Ocean Study Reveals

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The ocean’s power to rein in carbon and protect the environment is vast but not well-understood. But now, an international team of scientists has begun to illuminate how the ocean plucks carbon from the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming, and shuttles it to the bottom of the sea.

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Climate Change Helps Bats to Spread Their Wings

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Study on Kuhl's pipistrelle shows why bats have moved across Europe since the 1980s.

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Whooping Cranes' Predatory Behavior Key for Adaptation, Survival

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The whooping crane, with its snowy white plumage and trumpeting call, is one of the most beloved American birds, and one of the most endangered. As captive-raised cranes are re-introduced in Louisiana, they are gaining a new descriptor: natural killer. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, suggests Louisiana cranes are faring well thanks in part to their penchant for hunting reptiles and amphibians.

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Genetics Help Fish Thrive in Toxic Environments, Collaborative Study Finds

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A 10-year collaborative project led by biologists from Kansas State University and Washington State University has discovered how the Atlantic molly is able to live in toxic hydrogen sulfide water.

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Fossil Discovery: Extraordinary ‘Big-Mouthed’ Fish From Cretaceous Period

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An international team of scientists have discovered two new plankton-eating fossil fish species of the genus called Rhinconichthys from the oceans of the Cretaceous Period, about 92 million years ago, when dinosaurs roamed the planet.

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Scientists Propose "Pumpjack" Mechanism for Splitting and Copying DNA

New close-up images of the proteins that copy DNA inside the nucleus of a cell have led a team of scientists to propose a brand new mechanism for how this molecular machinery works. The scientists studied proteins from yeast cells, which share many features with the cells of complex organisms such as humans, and could offer new insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry.

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Early Human Ancestor Didn’t Have the Jaws of a Nutcracker, Study Finds

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Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that a possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products. But new research by an international team of researchers now shows that Australopithecus sediba didn’t have the jaw and tooth structure necessary to exist on a steady diet of hard foods.

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Discovery: Many White-Tailed Deer Have Malaria

By chance, scientists have discovered a malaria parasite that infects white-tailed deer. It’s the first-ever malaria parasite known to live in a deer species and the only native malaria parasite found in any mammal in North or South America.

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Man-Made Underwater Sound May Have Wider Ecosystem Effects Than Previously Thought

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Underwater sound linked to human activity could alter the behaviour of seabed creatures that play a vital role in marine ecosystems, according to new research from the University of Southampton.

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Radar Reveals the Hidden Secrets of Wombat Warrens

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For the first time ever, researchers from the University of Adelaide have been able to non-invasively study the inner workings of wombat warrens, with a little help from ground-penetrating radar.

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Galactic Center's Gamma Rays Unlikely to Originate From Dark Matter, Evidence Shows

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Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands.

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New Research Sharpens Understanding of Poison-Arrow Hunting in Africa

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While academic awareness of African peoples' hunting with poison-tipped arrows extends back for centuries, knowledge of the ingenious practice has been scattered among chemistry, entomology and anthropology texts.

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Ship Noise Extends to Frequencies Used by Endangered Killer Whales

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When an endangered orca is in hot pursuit of an endangered salmon, sending out clicks and listening for their echoes in the murky ocean near Seattle, does the noise from the nearby shipping lane interfere with them catching dinner? To find out scientists measured underwater noise as ships passed their study site 3,000 times. This unprecedented characterization of ship noise will aid in the understanding of the potential effects on marine life, and help with possible mitigation strategies.