Curated News: National Institute on Aging (NIA)

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Newswise: University of Kentucky Researchers Develop Online Portal to Show How Biases in RNA Sequences Affect Gene Expression
Released: 29-Jun-2022 12:50 PM EDT
University of Kentucky Researchers Develop Online Portal to Show How Biases in RNA Sequences Affect Gene Expression
University of Kentucky

A recent publication from researchers at the University of Kentucky explains the importance of identifying and understanding how differences between tissues and cells alter gene expression without changing the underlying genetic code.

Newswise: New Functional Protein Measuring Technology Could Advance Drug Discovery Research
Released: 29-Jun-2022 10:05 AM EDT
New Functional Protein Measuring Technology Could Advance Drug Discovery Research
Stony Brook University

A new biomedical research tool that enables scientists to measure hundreds of functional proteins in a single cell could offer new insights into cell machinery. Details about the cyclic microchip assay method are published in the journal Nature Communications.

22-Jun-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Fixed vial sizes for controversial Alzheimer's drug could waste $605 million in Medicare spending each year
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Medicare could waste up to $605 million per year on the controversial Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab if it is eventually approved for widespread use because it is supplied in vials containing fixed doses that may not be appropriate for all patients–resulting in the trashing of large volumes of unused drug

Newswise: Women's Heart Attacks Are Often Missed. This Gene May Help Explain Why.
Released: 23-Jun-2022 4:35 PM EDT
Women's Heart Attacks Are Often Missed. This Gene May Help Explain Why.
University of Florida

Newly identified genes may help explain why women experience different heart disease symptoms than men do, which often leads to misdiagnosing serious problems.

Released: 23-Jun-2022 6:00 AM EDT
Scientists Hope to Create a Health ‘Scorecard’ for Dementia Risk
UC Davis Health

An important new study of diverse communities is looking at how brain changes, genetics and other factors contribute to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The results could affect millions. Among people 65 and older, about 1 in 9 has Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: Ageism and Health: Study Shows Close Links
14-Jun-2022 8:35 AM EDT
Ageism and Health: Study Shows Close Links
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly all older adults have experienced some form of ageism in their everyday lives, a new study finds -- whether it’s seeing ageist messages and images on television or the internet, encountering people who imply that they’re less capable just because they’re older, or believing stereotypes about aging.

Released: 1-Jun-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Study Continues Assessment of Cognition and Decline in Aging Latinos
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego have received a $25.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and National Institute on Aging to continue the Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging, a 12-year assessment of cognitive and brain aging and impairment among aging Latinos.

26-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Comorbidities Can Increase Plasma Biomarker Levels Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease
Wake Forest School of Medicine

New research shows that comorbidities such as chronic kidney disease are associated with higher plasma p-tau levels.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 25-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they discovered that a special sugar molecule could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. If further research confirms the finding, the molecule, known as a glycan, could serve as a new target for early diagnostic tests, treatments and perhaps prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, say the researchers.

Newswise: ‘Sting’ Protein’s Efforts to Clean Up Brain Cell Damage May Speed Parkinson’s Disease Progress
Released: 19-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
‘Sting’ Protein’s Efforts to Clean Up Brain Cell Damage May Speed Parkinson’s Disease Progress
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In studies with mouse and human tissue, as well as live mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that a snag in the normal process of cleaning up broken DNA in brain cells may hasten the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

Released: 11-May-2022 10:45 AM EDT
Study points to need for substantial improvement in heart attack outcomes across high-income nations
Harvard Medical School

Analysis shows substantial differences in treatment, outcomes, and efficiency in heart attack care across six high-income countries despite well-established international guidelines U.S. heart attack death rate was among the highest, even with adherence to recommended treatments and faring well on other measures All countries excelled in some measures, but none excelled in all, even though well-established international guidelines are readily available

Newswise: Active phase calorie restriction enhances longevity, UT Southwestern neuroscience study reveals
Released: 6-May-2022 12:05 AM EDT
Active phase calorie restriction enhances longevity, UT Southwestern neuroscience study reveals
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A new study in mice led by neuroscientists at UT Southwestern’s Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute shows that it’s not just calories that count.

Newswise:Video Embedded for-neurons-where-they-begin-isn-t-necessarily-where-they-end
VIDEO
Released: 20-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
For Neurons, Where They Begin Isn’t Necessarily Where They End
University of California San Diego Health

Scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute of Genomic Medicine describe novel methods for inferring the movement of human brain cells during fetal development by studying healthy adult individuals who have recently passed away from natural causes.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Einstein Aging Study Receives $32 Million Grant to Study Alzheimer’s Disease
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

To help address the rising tide of Alzheimer’s disease nationwide, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in collaboration with faculty at Pennsylvania State University and other institutions, have received a five-year, $32 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support the ongoing Einstein Aging Study (EAS), which focuses on both normal aging and the special challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, and other dementias. EAS was established at Einstein in 1980 and has been continuously funded by the NIH.

Released: 19-Apr-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Mayo researchers, collaborators affirm useful blood biomarker for group of brain disorders in new study
Mayo Clinic

A test of protein in the blood gets further support as a biomarker for patients diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a group of brain disorders with few treatment options. These disorders are characterized by changes in behavior, cognition, language or movement.

Newswise: Dallas researchers seeking senior participants for breathing study
Released: 12-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Dallas researchers seeking senior participants for breathing study
UT Southwestern Medical Center

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute on Aging recently approved funding for a 2022 study by the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine (IEEM), where a research team will look into how body weight – even extra weight gain like the kind recently resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic – may adversely affect breathing in seniors.

Released: 5-Apr-2022 10:20 AM EDT
Late-Onset Alcohol Abuse Can Be a Presenting Symptom of Dementia, Researchers Find
Mount Sinai Health System

Clinical awareness of connection between alcohol and dementia is paramount to providing the best patient care management

Released: 4-Apr-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Funded through an NIH R21 grant, NAU scientists combine PMI and Ecoss expertise to explore the role of gut microbiota in Alzheimer’s disease
Northern Arizona University

Funded through a $418,000 R21 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging, assistant professor Emily Cope, associate professor Greg Caporaso and professor Egbert Schwartz recently began working together on “Development of in vivo quantitative stable isotope probing to quantify microbiome dynamics in Alzheimer’s disease.”

Released: 15-Mar-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Enrollment is complete for the largest national clinical trial on approaches for dementia care
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The Dementia Care Study (D-CARE), a nation-wide clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of different approaches to caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, has reached its recruitment goal by enrolling 2,176 persons living with dementia and their caregivers

Newswise: Tulane awarded $14 million NIH grant to study why heart disease, diabetes may blunt brain benefits of estrogen therapy
Released: 7-Mar-2022 2:20 PM EST
Tulane awarded $14 million NIH grant to study why heart disease, diabetes may blunt brain benefits of estrogen therapy
Tulane University

Tulane scientists will use the five-year grant to better understand why the brain-protecting benefits of estrogen may not apply to all women, especially those with hypertension and Type 2 diabetes.

Released: 19-Jan-2022 2:00 PM EST
Gut bacteria differences between Black and white women linked to insulin sensitivity
UC Davis Health

A study led by UC Davis has found significant gut bacteria profile differences between Black and white women, even after accounting for their insulin sensitivity status.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Malfunctioning Brain Cells as Potential Target for Alzheimer’s Treatment
9-Dec-2021 12:00 PM EST
Scientists Identify Malfunctioning Brain Cells as Potential Target for Alzheimer’s Treatment
Wake Forest Baptist Health

For the first time, scientists have identified a rare population of potentially toxic senescent cells in human brains that can serve as a target for a new Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

Newswise: Unlocking the Cause of UTI-Induced Delirium
Released: 2-Dec-2021 11:20 AM EST
Unlocking the Cause of UTI-Induced Delirium
Cedars-Sinai

Older women are among the most susceptible to developing UTIs, an infection of the bladder and urethra that causes urinary urgency and pain. UTIs also can cause delirium in older people, resulting in a sharp decline in mental abilities that triggers disoriented thinking.

Released: 16-Nov-2021 6:00 PM EST
Canisius College Researchers Conduct Aging and Autism Study
Canisius College

Researchers from Canisius College publish evidence that autism characteristics are associated with challenges in physical health, mental health and psychological well-being during later life

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12-Nov-2021 5:05 PM EST
Sanford Burnham Prebys unravels mysteries of the aging Down syndrome brain
Sanford Burnham Prebys

New research from Sanford Burnham Prebys has revealed features of the aging Down syndrome brain that could help explain why people with Down syndrome almost inevitably get Alzheimer's later in life.

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Released: 15-Nov-2021 11:20 AM EST
Exploring Psychological Resiliency of Older Adults with Diabetes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Studies suggest that exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with a variety of different mental health consequences including reports of depression, loneliness, and insomnia. People who are more than 65 years of age and those with underlying medical conditions such as type 2 diabetes and obesity are particularly vulnerable to negative outcomes from COVID-19. Until now, few investigations have identified and separated the mental health consequences of exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic from preexisting factors in this age group. A new prospective study of a large cohort of older adults with type 2 diabetes and overweight/obesity from across the U.S. has explored this subject with surprising results.

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Released: 11-Nov-2021 2:30 PM EST
New $20 Million Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Develop Technologies for Healthy Aging
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins has received a $20 million grant from the National Institute on Aging that will spur the development of artificial intelligence devices (AI) to improve the health of older adults and help them live independently for longer — a relatively untapped use of this technology.

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Released: 9-Nov-2021 1:45 PM EST
UCI Center for Neural Circuit Mapping Investigators receive funding from three federal awards for a total of more than $7M
University of California, Irvine

The University of California, Irvine Center for Neural Circuit Mapping (CNCM) has been awarded three new grants: a four year, $4.8M grant from the National Institute on Aging; a three year, $1.8M grant from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and, a one year, $.5M grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. The grants will support the efforts of CNCM Investigators to develop powerful new molecular tools and will enhance resources offered by the Center to neurosciences researchers worldwide.

Newswise: UTSW scientists eliminate key Alzheimer’s feature in animal model
Released: 29-Oct-2021 8:05 AM EDT
UTSW scientists eliminate key Alzheimer’s feature in animal model
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A study by UT Southwestern researchers finds that changing the biochemistry of parts of brain cells abolished the formation of amyloid beta plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The finding, published in eLife, might eventually lead to treatments that prevent the memory-robbing condition in humans.

Newswise: $7.5 million to study elusive cell type important in aging, cancer, other diseases
Released: 20-Oct-2021 1:00 PM EDT
$7.5 million to study elusive cell type important in aging, cancer, other diseases
Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is joining the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) new research network focused on the study of senescent cells, a rare and important population of cells that is difficult to study but vital for understanding aging and the diseases of aging, including cancer and neurodegeneration. The goal is to help researchers develop new therapies that target cellular senescence to prevent or treat such diseases and improve human health.

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Released: 6-Oct-2021 12:50 PM EDT
FSU researchers find sense of purpose associated with better memory
Florida State University

Add an improved memory to the list of the many benefits that accompany having a sense of purpose in life. A new study led by Florida State University researchers showed a link between an individual’s sense of purpose and their ability to recall vivid details.

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Released: 5-Oct-2021 1:40 PM EDT
$35 million to support study of sleep disorder linked to neurodegeneration
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and The Neuro (Montreal Neurological Institute-Hospital) of McGill University have received a five-year grant expected to total $35.1 million for an extension of a study designed to develop biomarkers that indicate which people with the sleep disorder will go on to develop neurodegenerative diseases.

Released: 5-Oct-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Sleep disorder linked to neurodegeneration aim of NIH-funded grant
Mayo Clinic

People with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder act out their dreams. While sleeping safely in bed, for example, they might throw up their arms to catch an imaginary ball or try to run from an illusory assailant.

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Released: 1-Oct-2021 2:40 PM EDT
VUMC Awarded $31.7 Million to Harmonize Alzheimer’s Research Data
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has been awarded a five-year, $31.7 million grant by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to harmonize research data gathered on human subjects in scores of disparate studies of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD).

Released: 28-Sep-2021 12:50 PM EDT
UNLV Research Bolsters Link Between Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

In a study published in the September issue of the journal Communications Biology, UNLV neuroscientists show that chronic hyperglycemia impairs working memory performance and alters fundamental aspects of working memory networks.

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Released: 14-Sep-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Do doctors treat pain differently based on their patients’ race?
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Physicians prescribed opioids more often to their white patients who complained of new-onset low back pain than to their Black, Asian and Hispanic patients during the early days of the national opioid crisis, when prescriptions for these powerful painkillers were surging but their dangers were not fully apparent.

Released: 9-Sep-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Researchers: Majority of patients with Alzheimer’s disease would not have been eligible for clinical trials of new controversial Alzheimer’s drug    
Beth Israel Lahey Health

In a research letter in JAMA, physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) found that the vast majority of patients who had a diagnosis of either cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, or Alzheimer’s disease related disorders, including cardiovascular disease, prior stroke, use of blood thinners, and age over 85 years, would have been excluded them from the aducanumab clinical trials.

31-Aug-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Rheumatoid arthritis treated with implanted cells that release drug
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation.

Newswise: Do Genetics Control Who Our Friends Are? It Seems So with Mice.
Released: 1-Sep-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Do Genetics Control Who Our Friends Are? It Seems So with Mice.
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Have you ever met someone you instantly liked, or at other times, someone who you knew immediately that you did not want to be friends with, although you did not know why? Now, a new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) suggests that there may be a biological basis behind this instantaneous compatibility reaction.

Newswise: Hackensack University Medical Center to Open Clinical Trial for Medication to Treat Alzheimer’s-Related Agitation
Released: 24-Aug-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Hackensack University Medical Center to Open Clinical Trial for Medication to Treat Alzheimer’s-Related Agitation
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack Meridian Hackensack University Medical Center, Center for Memory Loss and Brain Health will be participating in a multicenter clinical trial to study the safety and efficacy of escitalopram, an antidepressant, for the treatment of agitation related to Alzheimer’s disease. This study is sponsored by the National Institute on Aging. Johns Hopkins University is the principal site and Hackensack University Medical Center will begin enrolling patients in the study starting in September 2021.

16-Aug-2021 8:25 AM EDT
Existing Drug May Help Improve Responses to Cellular Therapies in Advanced Leukemias
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows how to overcome resistance to CAR T cell therapy with an experimental small molecule inhibitor.

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Released: 6-Aug-2021 6:10 PM EDT
Physicians Are Likelier to Test for a Particular Condition if Recent Patients They Saw Were Diagnosed with the Same Thing
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Emergency department physicians who saw patients with a pulmonary embolism—a blood clot in the lung—were about 15% likelier over the next 10 days to test subsequent patients for the same thing.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:40 PM EDT
New Grant to Help Advance Alzheimer's Disease Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A five-year, nearly $6 million grant from the National Institute on Aging will allow investigators with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Biomedical Informatics to use artificial intelligence (AI) to advance Alzheimer’s disease research.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos
University of California San Diego Health

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

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Released: 13-Jul-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Recent Study Identifies 11 Candidate Genetic Variants for Alzheimer’s Disease
University of Kentucky

A recently published study co-authored by University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging researcher Justin Miller, Ph.D., identifies 11 rare candidate variants for Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers found 19 different families in Utah that suffered from Alzheimer’s disease more frequently than what is considered normal.

Newswise: Grant Awarded to Help Determine if Meningitis and Sepsis Increase a Person's Chances of Developing Alzheimer's Disease
Released: 29-Jun-2021 5:45 PM EDT
Grant Awarded to Help Determine if Meningitis and Sepsis Increase a Person's Chances of Developing Alzheimer's Disease
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The role of peripheral and brain infections in the development of Alzheimer's disease is the focus of new research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), funded with a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Newswise: New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
17-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
Harvard Medical School

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection increased 30 percent for households with a recent birthday in counties with high rates of COVID-19 Findings suggest informal social gatherings such as birthday parties played role in infection spread at the height of the coronavirus pandemic No birthday-bash infection jumps seen in areas with low rates of COVID-19 Households with children’s birthdays had greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection than with adult birthdays

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Released: 4-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
New research may offer hope for Alzheimer's patients
University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky Neuroscience Professor Greg Gerhardt's new research program will provide answers to long-standing questions about the role of neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. A culmination of his nearly 40 years of brain research, Gerhardt's study could help to develop new treatments for the disease.

Released: 19-May-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Final results of SPRINT study confirm controlling blood pressure critically important in preventing heart disease and stroke
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

News release about the follow-up data from the landmark SPRINT study of the effect of high blood pressure on cardiovascular disease have confirmed that aggressive blood pressure management — lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg -- dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death from these diseases, as well as death from all causes, compared to lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mm Hg.

Released: 17-May-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Novel Rehab Program Improves Outcome for Older Heart-failure Patients, Study Finds
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Heart failure (HF) – when the heart can’t pump enough blood and oxygen through the body – affects approximately 6.2 million adults in the United States and is the primary cause of hospitalization in the elderly. Unfortunately, older adults with heart failure often have poor outcomes resulting in reduced quality of life, high mortality and frequent rehospitalizations.


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