Feature Channels:

Hearing

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Cochlear Implants, Deaf Children, Machine Learning, Language acquisition, MRI scan

Brain Imaging Predicts Language Learning in Deaf Children

YoungNancy14_RGB.jpg

In a new international collaborative study between The Chinese University of Hong Kong and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, researchers created a machine learning algorithm that uses brain scans to predict language ability in deaf children after they receive a cochlear implant. This study’s novel use of artificial intelligence to understand brain structure underlying language development has broad reaching implications for children with developmental challenges. It was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Medicine

Channels:

water borne illness

Illnesses Caused by Recreation on the Water Costs $2.9 Billion Annually in the US

Swimming, paddling, boating and fishing account for more than 90 million cases of gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, eye and skin-related illnesses per year in the U.S. with an estimated annual cost of $2.9 billion, according to a new report by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.This is the first time the cost associated with waterborne illnesses contracted during recreational activities in the U.

Medicine

Channels:

Your Disease Risk, Substance Abuse Treatments, Comparing Lung Cancer Treatments, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

Channels:

Tinnitus, Otolaryngology, Hearing, Neuroscience, Ringing In The Ears, Somatosensory

Specially Timed Signals Ease Tinnitus Symptoms in First Test Aimed at the Condition’s Root Cause

Millions of Americans hear ringing in their ears -- a condition called tinnitus -- but a new study shows an experimental device could help quiet the phantom sounds by targeting unruly nerve activity in the brain. Results of the first animal tests and clinical trial of the approach resulted in a decrease in tinnitus loudness and improvement in tinnitus-related quality of life.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Environmental Stressors, CRISPR Treatment for Hearing Loss, Mitochondria and Cocaine Addiction, and More in the Cell Biology News Source

The latest research and features in cell biology in the Cell Biology News Source

Science

Channels:

Nature Communications, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Deafness, DEAF, human ear, Zebrafish, deafness gene, Gene Therapy, Brain McDermott, Ruben Stepanyan, Otolarnygology, Molecular Mechanisms, Genetic Deafness, mechanotransduction, NIH, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicat

Fish Use Deafness Gene to Sense Water Motion

Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. The shared gene allows zebrafish to sense water flow direction, and it also helps cells inside the human ear sense a range of sounds.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

CRISPR, CRISP/Cas9, Deafness, Hearing Loss, Hair Cells, Genetic Deafness, David Liu

CRISPR Treatment Prevents Hearing Loss in Mice

haircells2.jpg

A single treatment of a genome editing agent partially preserved hearing in mice with genetic deafness. The work could one day help scientists treat certain forms of genetic hearing loss in humans.

Medicine

Channels:

CRISPR Therapy Preserves Hearing in Progressive Deafness Model

BannerZhengYi.jpg

Hearing loss is the most common form of sensory loss in humans, and almost half of cases have an underlying genetic cause.

Medicine

Channels:

Hearing Loss, Wayne State University, Niehs, NIH, Firefighter health

New NIH Study to Research the Risk of Hearing Loss in Detroit Firefighters

Jamesdanielheadshotweb.jpg

With the help of funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of the National Institutes of Health, a Wayne State University professor is researching gene-environment interactions to determine the association between environmental exposure to lead and cadmium and hearing loss in Detroit firefighters.

Medicine

Channels:

Hearing, Sound, Brain, Mozart Effect, Autism, TBI, Neurons, Fetus, Brain Development, Brain Development In Children, Cortex

Scientists Identify First Brain Cells That Respond to Sound

A new study is the first to identify a mechanism that could explain an early link between sound input and cognitive function, often called the “Mozart effect.”







Chat now!