Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 1350
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Dec-2018 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705389

Neurons with Good Housekeeping Are Protected from Alzheimer’s

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

A new study finds that some brain cells protect themselves from Alzheimer’s with a cellular cleaning system that sweeps away toxic proteins associated with the disease.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 8:05 AM EST
Lasater_head_shot2.jpg

Article ID: 705534

End of Life Care Quality Remains a Problem – Nurses May be a Solution

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing’s Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) describes the quality of end of life care in nearly 500 U.S. hospitals, utilizing nearly 13,000 bedside nurses as informants of quality. The study has been published online first. It will also be in a future issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
Immune-cell-large.jpg

Article ID: 705402

The “Greying” of T Cells

Harvard Medical School

Research in mouse cells identifies defective metabolic pathway in aging immune T cells. The pathway is critical for switching T cells from dormancy into illness-fighting mode. In experiments, researchers restored lagging T-cell function by adding small-molecule compounds. Findings suggest possible mechanism behind weakened immunity common in the elderly.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 11:15 AM EST
Linda_Watkins.CC65.JPG

Article ID: 705370

Spinal Cord Injuries Throw Body Clocks Off Schedule, New Study Shows

University of Colorado Boulder

Following a spinal cord injury, the body’s internal clocks fall out of sync, impacting temperature, hormones and immunity, according to new research funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. The findings could lead to “chronotherapies” to reset clocks and improve recovery.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 4:45 PM EST

Article ID: 705340

Hearing loss is a risk factor for premature death

Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

A new study links hearing loss with an increased risk for mortality before the age of 75 due to cardiovascular disease. Researchers at the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health found that mortality among those with hearing loss is elevated, particularly among men and women younger than age 75 and those who are divorced or separated.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
18-Dec-2018 1:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
12-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Dec-2018 1:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 705317

Resoluciones para el año nuevo: experto de Mayo Clinic ofrece sugerencias para vivir más largo

Mayo Clinic

A medida que el nuevo año se aproxima, entre las resoluciones de muchas personas está alcanzar un buen estado físico y mejorar el bienestar. Ahora, los científicos descubren que ambas mejoras pueden llevar a vivir más largo.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
20-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
12-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

forecast-tau.jpeg

Article ID: 705252

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer’s disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which type of dementia will develop over time – a form of personalized medicine for neurodegenerative diseases.

Released:
11-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

Showing results

110 of 1350

Chat now!