Feature Channels:

Bone Health

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Bone Health

Showing results

110 of 836
APS_Profile.jpg

Article ID: 715333

Vitamin D Important for Preeclampsia Prevention

American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests vitamin D may reverse impaired cell interactions in the blood vessels that occur in preeclampsia—a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure. The finding is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology.

Released:
9-Jul-2019 7:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Researchers Enhance Surgical Training with 3D Printing

Article ID: 715445

Researchers Enhance Surgical Training with 3D Printing

Texas A&M University

Merging engineering and medical education, a team is providing surgeons-in-training with more realistic and accurate orthopedic surgery simulations through 3D printing and visualized performance data.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 4:25 PM EDT
BIDMC_Stk_Logo_CMYK_AW_300dpi.jpg

Article ID: 715229

BIDMC’s Research & Health News Digest – June 2019 Edition

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A monthly roundup of research briefs showcasing recent scientific advances led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center faculty.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 5:00 PM EDT
hrt-logo.gif

Article ID: 715201

Low vitamin D at birth raises risk of higher blood pressure in kids

American Heart Association (AHA)

Vitamin D deficiency from birth to early childhood was associated with an increased risk of elevated blood pressure in later childhood and adolescence

Released:
1-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: GettyImages%20Senior%20woman%20exercising%20with%20weights.jpg

Article ID: 714930

Arthritis and exercise: Why it helps to be more physically active

LifeBridge Health

More than 50 million U.S. adults have arthritis. Many experience severe joint pain and, likely because of their pain, don’t do much exercising if at all.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Remote-controlled drug delivery implant the size of a grape may help chronic disease management
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714748

Remote-controlled drug delivery implant the size of a grape may help chronic disease management

Houston Methodist

People with chronic diseases like arthritis, diabetes and heart disease may one day forego the daily regimen of pills and, instead, receive a scheduled dosage of medication through a grape-sized implant that is remotely controlled.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 10:15 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714705

Women Exposed to Common Antibacterial Chemical More Likely to Break a Bone

Endocrine Society

Women exposed to triclosan are more likely to develop osteoporosis, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Hydrogel Offers Double Punch Against Orthopedic Bone Infections

Article ID: 714778

Hydrogel Offers Double Punch Against Orthopedic Bone Infections

Georgia Institute of Technology

Surgery prompted by automobile accidents, combat wounds, cancer treatment and other conditions can lead to bone infections that are difficult to treat and can delay healing until they are resolved. Now, researchers have a developed a double-duty hydrogel that both attacks the bacteria and encourages bone regrowth with a single application containing two active components.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 8:05 AM EDT
color-without-R-core-standard.png

Article ID: 714716

Hernias Can Happen to Anyone, Especially After Abdominal Surgery

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Every year, nearly 700,000 Americans have surgery for groin hernias.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 5:05 PM EDT

Channels:

Bone Health, Healthcare

Languages:

English

Newswise: Study Shows Experimental Drug Can Encourage Bone Growth in Children with Dwarfism

Article ID: 714497

Study Shows Experimental Drug Can Encourage Bone Growth in Children with Dwarfism

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Australia and seven other medical institutions report that an experimental drug called vosoritide, which interferes with certain proteins that block bone growth, allowed the average annual growth rate to increase in a study of 35 children and teenagers with achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism. The patients’ average boost in height to about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) per year is close to growth rates among children of average stature, and the side effects of the drug were mostly mild, according to the researchers.

Released:
18-Jun-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Showing results

110 of 836

Chat now!