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Over-Reliance of Pulse Oximetry for Children With Respiratory Infection

Among infants presenting to a pediatric emergency department with mild to moderate bronchiolitis, those with an artificially elevated oxygen saturation reading were less likely to be hospitalized or receive hospital care for more than 6 hours than those with unaltered readings, suggesting that these readings should not be the only factor in the decision to admit or discharge, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA.

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Club Cells Are “Bad Guys” During Flu Infection

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Reserachers show that a specialized subset of lung cells can shake flu infection, yet they remain stamped with an inflammatory gene signature that wreaks havoc in the lung.

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Previous Pulmonary Disease Linked to Increased Lung Cancer Risk in Large Study

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals.

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RTI International Develops Novel Lung-on-a-Chip

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Researchers at RTI International, in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have developed a new lung-on-chip microdevice for laboratory studies of respiratory challenges and therapeutics. The microdevice includes multiple vertically stacked cellular layers that mimic the structure of the airway tissue.

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Sugary Bugs Subvert Antibodies

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Researchers reveal how a lung-damaging bacterium turns the body's antibody response in its favor.

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New Anesthesia Technique Helps Show Cause of Obstruction in Sleep Apnea

A simplified anesthesia procedure may enable more widespread use of preoperative testing to demonstrate the cause of airway obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Antismoking Campaigns Effective Among Minorities and People with Lower Education, Income

Antismoking advertising effectively promotes attempts to quit smoking among vulnerable population groups, including minorities and people with lower education and income, according to a new study by researcher at RTI International.

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Major Advances in Alzheimer’s, Colon Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, and Sleep Apnea Testing, and in Maternal-Fetal Health Research to Be Highlighted at 2014 AACC Annual Meeting

The groundbreaking scientific studies featured at the 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo will include research on a blood test for Alzheimer’s that uses biochip technology, a new test to diagnose colon cancer early, a more accurate method for determining multiple myeloma prognosis, a less stressful test for sleep apnea, and the development of a bank of biospecimens from pregnant women that could prove crucial for women’s health research.

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UNC Researchers Find Unsuspected Characteristics of New CF Drugs

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In lab experiments using tissue samples cultured from cystic fibrosis patients, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and the UNC Marsico Lung Institute have shown that a new CF drug counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of another CF drug.

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Penn Researchers Successfully Alleviate Pulmonary Inflammation through Targeted Drug Delivery

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Pulmonary inflammation can cause shallow breathing and the lungs to become brittle in patients who experience multiple blood transfusions, sepsis, lung surgery and acute lung trauma. This complication can leave patients on ventilators, which can further traumatize the lungs, and often results in a mortality rate of 30 to 40 percent. To date, no medication has been successful at preventing or mitigating the damage caused by lung inflammation. Now, a multidisciplinary research team led by David Eckmann, MD, PhD, Horatio C. Wood Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and professor of Bioengineering in Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, has found that when delivered by a microscopic transporter called a nanocarrier, steroids can access the hard-to-reach lung endothelial cells that need it most and are successful at preventing inflammation in mice.

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