Feature Channels

Ecology and Animals

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Fecal Transplants Let Packrats Eat Poison

WoodratCreosoteByKohl_300dpi2.4MB.jpg

Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found.

View

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

A Natural Way to Monitor, and Possibly Control Populations of, Stink Bugs


image620658.jpg

Anyone who has squashed a stink bug knows why they got their name. Although just a nuisance to homeowners, the insects feed on and damage fruits and vegetables, causing significant economic losses for farmers. Now scientists report in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products that they’ve discovered certain stink bug pheromone components and made them artificially in the lab for the first time, and these substances can be used to monitor and manage their populations.

View

Science

Channels:

Hungry, Invasive ‘Crazy Worm’ Makes First Appearance in Wisconsin

arboretumworm.jpg

Wisconsin’s newest invasive species has done its best to stay underground, but the voracious, numerous and mysterious Asian crazy worm has emerged for the first time in the state on the campus of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Spectacular Marine and Terrestrial Wildlife Haven Becomes Four Million-Acre Biosphere Reserve

DSC_0198elephantsealsPeninsulaValdescorrectedredbyGHarrisWCS.JPG

A rugged peninsula in Argentina’s Patagonia region teeming with wildlife has been declared a Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations Environmental, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Zebra, Quagga Mussels Trump Pollution as Change Agents in Lake Erie

Quaggaandzebram.JPG

Researchers find that invasive species,such as zebra mussels, have affected the composition of Lake Erie's zoobenthic community more than pollution has.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Happy Feet III: Adélie Penguin Population is Actually on the Rise

LynchHeather14.jpg

The first global census of the Adélie penguin, long considered a key indicator species to monitor and understand the effects of climate change and fishing in the Southern Ocean, has revealed its population (3.79 million breeding pairs) to be 53 percent larger than previously estimated. By using high-resolution satellite imagery, Stony Brook University ecologist Heather Lynch, PhD, and conservation biologist Michelle LaRue, PhD, of the University of Minnesota, have applied a new method that permits regular monitoring of Adélie penguins across their entire breeding range, and by extension the health of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Their findings are published in The Auk, Orinthological Advances.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

New Spawning Reefs to Boost Native Fish in St. Clair River

construction-rock-spawning-lake-sturgeon-orig-2012-05-08.jpg

Construction of two new fish-spawning reefs is about to begin in the St. Clair River northeast of Detroit, the latest chapter in a decade-plus effort to restore native species such as lake sturgeon, walleye and lake whitefish.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Scientists Find the Shocking Truth About Electric Fish

eel.JPG

Scientists have found how the electric fish evolved its jolt. Writing June 27, 2014 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix Institute in Redmond, Washington identifies the regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field.

View | Comment

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Chimps Like Listening to Music with a Different Beat, Research Finds

chimp-large.jpg

While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

To Avoid Interbreeding, Monkeys Have Undergone Evolution in Facial Appearance

HighamErythrotis.jpg

Old World monkeys have undergone a remarkable evolution in facial appearance as a way of avoiding interbreeding with closely related and geographically proximate species, researchers from NYU and the University of Exeter have found. Their research provides the best evidence to date for the role of visual cues as a barrier to breeding across species.

View | Comment