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Kazakhstan, Wildlife, Tigers, Extinction, Central Asia, Biological Conservation

Tigers Could Roam Again in Central Asia, Scientists Say

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Caspian tigers, some of the largest cats that ever lived, roamed through much of Central Asia before they were designated as extinct in the middle of the 20th century. But there is a chance that tigers — using a subspecies that is nearly identical, genetically, to the Caspian — could be restored to Central Asia.

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Are Herders and Livestock Bad for Rare Wildlife? It’s Complicated.

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The Denver Zoological Foundation, WCS(Wildlife Conservation Society) and other partners have published a paper appearing in the early view edition of Conservation Biology that looks at the positive and negative relationships occurring between pastoralists, livestock, native carnivores and native herbivores in the world’s largest unfenced grassland and desert.

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Exeter Research Helps Protect Loggerhead Turtles

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A long-running research and conservation project is helping save an at-risk species of turtle.

Medicine

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Mapping Movements of Alien Bird Species

The global map of alien bird species has been produced for the first time by a UCL-led team of researchers. It shows that human activities are the main determinants of how many alien bird species live in an area but that alien species are most successful in areas already rich with native bird species.

Science

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bats, place cells, grid cells, Memory, Ulanovsky

Found: Neurons That Orient Bats Toward Destination

Bats – like humans – can find their favorite fruit stand (or coffee shop) even when it’s hidden behind a screen or tall buildings. How? The Weizmann Institute of Science’s Prof. Nachum Ulanovsky and team have now identified the neurons that point bats in the right direction, even when their destination is obscured. This could aid understanding of some aspects of Alzheimer’s.

Science

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Climate Change, Kansas State University, K-State, Andrew Hope, Division of Biology, KSU, Warming, shrews, Small Mammals, insectivors, Arctic, Parasites, Ecosystems, Ecology

'Shrew'-D Advice: Study of Arctic Shrews, Parasites Indicates How Climate Change May Affect Ecosystems and Communities

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MANHATTAN, KANSAS — The shrew and its parasites — even 40-year-old preserved ones — are the new indicators of environmental change, according to a Kansas State University researcher. Andrew Hope, Kansas State University research assistant professor in the Division of Biology, and his colleagues across the U.S. have published "Shrews and Their Parasites: Small Species Indicate Big Changes" in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 2016 Arctic Report Card.

Science

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Missouri University of Science and Technology, ants, Biology, Society, Insects

Ants Need Work-Life Balance, Research Suggests

The work habits of ants could provide valuable insight into making our societies more productive and sustainable, says a team of Missouri S&T researchers.

Science

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Jan-2017 2:00 PM EST

Science

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Caribbean Bats Need 8 Million Years to Recover From Recent Extinction Waves

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Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this diversity? To answer these questions, a research team compiled data on Caribbean bats and their close relatives in a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

Science

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Bumblebee, neonicotinoids, imidacloprid

Neonicotinoid Pesticide Affects Foraging and Social Interaction in Bumblebees

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linked changes in social behavior with sublethal exposure to the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid.

Science

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Rocky Mountain Haze

University of Utah atmospheric scientist Gannet Hallar and colleagues find a correlation between the severity of drought in the Intermountain West and the summertime air quality, particularly the concentration of aerosol particles, in remote mountain wilderness regions.

Science

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Bernhardt/Meier Laboratory , bees, Wildflowers, Pollination

Saint Louis University Scientists Discover Bees Prefer Warm Violets in Cool Forests

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Studies provide fresh insight into how such tiny wild flowers continue to thrive and reproduce.

Science

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Toads

The Mystery of the Earless Toads

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More than 200 species of “true toads” have fully functional inner ears, but cannot fully use them because they have lost their tympanic middle ears, the part of the ear which transmits sound air pressures from the outside world to the inner ear. These “earless” toads rely on sounds to communicate, so why would they lose a sense that is key to their survival and reproduction?

Science

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anole, adaptive radiation, developmental monitoring

Sticky Toes Provide Clues to Evolution

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Yet, how this key innovation evolved remains a mystery locked within the leathery shell of a lizard egg. Now, Dr. Thomas Sanger at Loyola University in Chicago has developed new techniques to understand more about the process of evolutionary diversification by observing development in real time.

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Big Data Shows How What We Buy Affects Endangered Species

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The things we consume, from iPhones to cars to IKEA furniture, have costs that go well beyond their purchase price. What if the soybeans used to make that tofu you ate last night were grown in fields that were hewn out of tropical rainforests? Or if that tee-shirt you bought came from an industrial area that had been carved out of high-value habitat in Malaysia?

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Songbirds Divorce, Flee, Fail to Reproduce Due to Suburban Sprawl

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New University of Washington research finds that for some songbirds, urban sprawl is kicking them out of their territory, forcing divorce and stunting their ability to find new mates and reproduce successfully, even after relocating.

Science

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bats, Echolocation, Wireless Communication

Bats Avoid Collisions by Calling Less in a Crowd

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Do bats adjust their echolocation calls in response to other bat calls

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China Announces It Will Shut Down Its Domestic Commercial Elephant Ivory Trade in 2017

The following statement was released today by the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Asia Executive Director Aili Kang.

Science

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Genome Study Reveals Widespread “Gray Zone” of Animals Transitioning From One Species to Two

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New research publishing December 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology characterizes the ability of populations to interbreed and exchange genes as a function of the level divergence of their genomes.

Science

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Paraguay Unveils New Management Plan for Jaguars

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Asunción, Paraguay (December 22, 2016) – The Government of Paraguay took a major step forward today to ensuring a future for the Western Hemisphere’s largest cat species by completing a country-wide management plan for jaguars, the culmination of two years of cooperation between government agencies, the public and private sectors, and researchers from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other NGOs.







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