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Why Vultures Matter – and What We Lose if They’re Gone

The primary threat to vultures is the presence of toxins in the carrion they consume. Losses of vultures can allow other scavengers to flourish. Proliferation of such scavengers could bring bacteria and viruses from carcasses into human cities.

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First Gene Linked to Temperature Sex Switch

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The sex of many reptile species is set by temperature. New research reported in the journal GENETICS identifies the first gene associated with temperature-dependent sex determination in any reptile. Variation at this gene in snapping turtles contributes to geographic differences in the way sex ratio is influenced by temperature. Understanding the genetics of sex determination could help predict how reptiles will evolve in response to climate change.

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Bats’ Flight Technique Could Lead to Better Drones

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Long-eared bats are assisted in flight by their ears and body, according to a study by researchers at Lund University in Sweden. The recent findings improve researchers’ understanding of the bats’ flying technique and could be significant for the future development of drones, among other things.

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NC State Study Asks Kids to Choose Wildlife Conservation Priorities

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Species with rapid population declines and those with important ecological roles were children's priorities for protection and funding. Those choices put kids in good company with adult conservation biologists.

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New Evidence Connects Dung Beetle Evolution to Dinosaurs

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Researchers have found an evolutionary connection between dinosaurs and dung beetles. An international team of scientists uncovered the first molecular evidence indicating that dung beetles evolved in association with dinosaurs. The findings place the origin of dung beetles (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) in the Lower Cretaceous period, with the first major diversification occurring in the middle of the Cretaceous. This timeline places their origins approximately 30 million years earlier than previously thought. The research explores the potential of a co-extinction with dinosaurs 66 million years ago. The study was published today in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

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Hollywood Star Brad Pitt Shares a Name with a New Wasp Species From South Africa

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Not only did an international research team discover two new endoparasitic wasp species in South Africa and India, and significantly expanded their genera's distributional range, but they also gave a celebrity name to a special one of them.

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Stickleback Fish Adapt Their Vision in the Blink of an Eye

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Stickleback fish are able to adapt their vision to new environments in less than 10,000 years, a blink of the eye in evolutionary terms, according to new research by University of British Columbia biodiversity experts.

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How Tree Crickets Tune Into Each Other's Songs

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It's known as the cocktail-party problem: in the cacophony of sound made by insects in a spring meadow, how does one species recognize its own song?

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The Following Statement Was Released Today by Dale Miquelle, Director of the WCS Russia Program on the Opening of the First Wildlife Tunnel in Russia

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“The Wildlife Conservation Society congratulates the Russian conservation community, especially Land of the Leopard National Park, on the grand opening of the Narvinskii Pass tunnel on March 26th, 2016.

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First-of-Its-Kind Global Analysis Indicates Leopards Have Lost Nearly 75 Percent of Their Historic Range

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The leopard (Panthera pardus), one of the world’s most iconic big cats, has lost as much as 75 percent of its historic range. This study represents the first known attempt to produce a comprehensive analysis of leopards’ status across their entire range and all nine subspecies.

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Experts Propose Strategy to Save Mammals on the Brink of Extinction

With only three living individuals left on this planet, the northern white rhinoceros could be considered doomed for extinction. But now researchers have proposed a road map for preserving such endangered species through techniques that use stem cells and assisted reproduction technology.

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Estimates of Cheetah Numbers Are 'Guesswork', Say Researchers

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Current estimates of the number of cheetahs in the wild are 'guesswork', say the authors of a new study which finds that the population in the cheetah stronghold of Maasai Mara, Kenya, is lower than previously thought.

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CSU's Jennifer Barfield Available to Talk Bison, National Mammal Status

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UF/IFAS Study on Luring, Trapping Dangerous Beetle Wins Prestigious Award

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The Royal Entomological Society has awarded its 2016 Best Paper Award to a paper written by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers. Lukasz Stelinski, an associate professor of entomology at the UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center, spearheaded the study in which investigators came up with a synthetic aroma to lure redbay ambrosia beetles into traps. “Identifying an effective lure for the beetle is an important step in developing management tools for this pathogen-spreading insect in Florida,” Stelinksi said.

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Biologists Find the Arizona Black Rattlesnake on ‘Extinction Trajectory’

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A combination of drought and fire has put the Arizona black rattlesnake on an “extinction trajectory,” according to University of Arkansas researchers.

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University of Kentucky Researchers Discover Three New Primate Species

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Twenty years ago, there were only two species of mouse lemurs. Today, including the newly-discovered species, mouse lemurs comprise 24 species. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List, 94 percent of lemurs are threatened with extinction.

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Indiana University Researchers Find Earth May Be Home to 1 Trillion Species

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Earth could contain nearly 1 trillion species, with only one-thousandth of 1 percent now identified, according to a study from biologists at Indiana University. The estimate, based on the intersection of large datasets and universal scaling laws, appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hydropeaking of River Water Levels Is Disrupting Insect Survival, River Ecosystems

A group of researchers concluded today in a study in the journal BioScience that "hydropeaking" of water flows on many rivers in the West has a devastating impact on aquatic insect abundance.

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No Males Needed: All-Female Salamanders Regrow Tails 36 Percent Faster

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The lady salamander that shuns male companionship may reap important benefits. For instance, when a predator snaps off her tail. New research from The Ohio State University compared an all-female population of mole salamanders to a related heterosexual species and found they grew their tails back 36 percent faster. The unisexual salamanders (part of the Ambystoma genus) contain DNA of up to five species and reproduce primarily by cloning themselves.

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Mother Nature Overshadows Impact of Anglers

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When it comes to reducing the number of walleye, anglers take a back seat to Mother Nature. That’s the one of the insights on harvest dynamics emerging from a research project to assess movement, mortality and the impact of anglers on walleye populations along the Missouri River from the Oahe Dam near Pierre, South Dakota, north to the Garrison Dam near Riverdale, North Dakota.