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Science

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Conservation, Tourism, Elephant, Poaching, Africa

The Great Elephant Census Reports Massive Loss of African Savannah Elephants

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Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. today announced the results of the $7 million, three-year Great Elephant Census, the first-ever pan-African survey of savanna elephants using standardized data collection and validation methods. The researchers report that the current rate of species decline is 8 percent per year, primarily due to poaching.

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Lightning Strikes: Thunderstorms Spread Mercury Pollution

In a new study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, Assistant Professor of Meteorology Christopher Holmes writes that thunderstorms have 50 percent higher concentrations of mercury than other rain events.

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Biology, Ecology and Environment, Evolution, Forestry Research, Genetics

What's Hiding Behind the Trapdoor?

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Australia is known as a country full of deadly creatures - now people have trapdoor spiders hiding in their backyards.

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Biology, Ecology and Environment, Entomology

Trapped in a Nuclear Weapon Bunker Wood Ants Survive for Years in Poland

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Having built their nest over the vertical ventilation pipe of an old nuclear weapon bunker in Poland, every year a large number of wood ants fall down the pipe to never return back to their colony.

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Study Confirms a Lost Century for Forest Elephants

Because forest elephants are one the slowest reproducing mammals in the world, it will take almost a century for them to recover from the intense poaching they have suffered since 2002.

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Pterosaur, Dinosaurs

A Rare Small Specimen Discovered From the Age of Flying Giants

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A rare small-bodied pterosaur, a flying reptile from the Late Cretaceous period approximately 77 million years ago, is the first of its kind to have been discovered on the west coast of North America.

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Microbiome

Monkeys in Zoos Have Human Gut Bacteria

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A new study led by the University of Minnesota shows that monkeys in captivity lose much of their native gut bacteria diversity and their gut bacteria ends up resembling those of humans. The results suggest that switching to a low-fiber, Western diet may have the power to deplete most normal primate gut microbes in favor of a less diverse set of bacteria.

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Plants Found to Regulate Leaf Temperature to Boost Carbon Uptake

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A new study has found that plants regulate their leaf temperature with some independence from the surrounding air temperature, a trait that increases carbon uptake through photosynthesis.

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Interactive Map Shows Where Animals Will Move Under Climate Change

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The University of Washington and The Nature Conservancy have created an animated map showing where mammals, birds and amphibians are projected to move in the Western Hemisphere in response to climate change.

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Biodiversity, Biology, Climate Change, Earth Science, Ecology and Environment, Oceanogaphy

The Sound of a Healthy Reef

A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) will help researchers understand the ways that marine animal larvae use sound as a cue to settle on coral reefs. The study, published on August 23rd in the online journal Scientific Reports, has determined that sounds created by adult fish and invertebrates may not travel far enough for larvae --which hatch in open ocean--to hear them, meaning that the larvae might rely on other means to home in on a reef system.

Business

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Branding, Marketing, eco-friendly, green advertising, Gender and Business

Going Green Is for Girls — but Branding Can Make Men Eco-Friendly

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Studies show that men are not as environmentally friendly as women. But could men be persuaded to go green? New research from the Mendoza College of Business indicates the answer is yes — and it’s all about branding.

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Avi Algazi, University of Haifa, , Avi Algazi, University Of Haifa, Jellyfish, sea temperature, Lunar Cycle

Sea Temperature and the Lunar Cycle Predict the Arrival of Jellyfish in Israel

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Large swarms of these jellyfish reach the coast when the sea temperature ranges between 28.2 and 30 degrees Celsius and during the full moon, according to a new study from the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management at the University of Haifa. The study reveals, for the first time, the link between sea temperature and the lunar cycle and the arrival of swarms of Jellyfish s along the coast of Israel.

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Keen-Nosed Canines in Tanzania Help Nab Poacher with Elephant Ivory

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Two dogs trained to detect ivory by scent recently made their first bust by helping government authorities seize four elephant tusks in a village outside Tanzania’s Ruaha National Park, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).

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Ranchers, Invasive Plant Species, department of agriculture, Research, weed management, bioeconomic model, economic consequences, field experiments, weed species, harmful chemicals

Wichita State University Invasive Species Research Will Aid Kansas Ranchers

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Two Wichita State University professors are conducting research on an invasive plant species to assist Kansas ranchers in their practices.

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Earth Science, marine and freshwater biology, Oceanography

Darwin's Theory About 'Impassable' Marine Barrier Holds True for Coral Larvae in the Pacific

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MIAMI--An international team of scientists used a state-of-the-art computer model, a high-powered supercomputer, and five billion 'virtual' coral larvae to test Charles Darwin's 1880 hypothesis that marine species cannot cross the Eastern Pacific's "impassable" marine barrier. The team, which included University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Claire Paris, found that Darwin's theory still hold true today even under extreme El Niño conditions known to speed up ocean currents.

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Geology & soil, Geophyscics, Gravity, Hydrology & water resources, planets and moon, Space And Planetary Science

Fossilized Rivers Suggest Warm, Wet Ancient Mars

Extensive systems of fossilised riverbeds have been discovered on an ancient region of the Martian surface, supporting the idea that the now cold and dry Red Planet had a warm and wet climate about 4 billion years ago, according to UCL-led research.

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Earth Science, Evolution, Palentology

New Tiny Species of Extinct Australian Marsupial Lion Named After Sir David Attenborough

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The fossil remains of a new tiny species of marsupial lion which prowled the lush rainforests of northern Australia about 18 million years ago have been unearthed in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote north-western Queensland.

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Atmospheric Science, Ecology and Environment, Climate Change, Fisheries and aquaculture, Marine Freshwater Biology

Rising Temperatures Could Accelerate Radiation Induced DNA Effects in Marine Mussels

Increased sea temperatures could dramatically enhance and accelerate radiation-induced DNA effects in marine invertebrates, a new study suggests.

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Evolution, genes, evolutionary development, cylcopism, Beetles, etymology, evodevo, Genetics, Development, Insects

'Cyclops' Beetles Hint at Solution to 'Chicken-and-Egg' Problem in Novel Trait Evolution

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Beetles with cyclops eyes have given Indiana University scientists insight into how new traits may evolve through the recruitment of existing genes -- even if these genes are already carrying out critical functions.

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Climate Change, Earth Science, Energy, Hydrology, Nature, Ecology and Environment, Nuclear Physics

Pro-Nuclear Countries Making Slower Progress on Climate Targets

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A strong national commitment to nuclear energy goes hand in hand with weak performance on climate change targets, researchers at the University of Sussex and the Vienna School of International Studies have found.







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