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Ecology and Animals

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Science

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Hawaii, Hawaiian coral reefs, Coral, Biodiversity, Marine Biology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Oct-2016 7:00 AM EDT

Science

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Deforestation, Cocoa, Bioscience, Amazon, illegal drugs, Ecology

Contrary to Popular Belief – Coca Not the Driving Force of Deforestation, Report Reveals

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Most of the world’s coca—the plant source of cocaine—grows in the Amazon forests of the Andean countries of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia, where many think this illicit crop causes deforestation. However, a team led by Stony Brook University Professor of Ecology and Evolution Liliana M. Dávalos, shows most deforestation isn’t caused by coca cultivation. In fact, the study, published in Bioscience, found that deforestation and coca both share a common origin in the implementation of an infrastructure plan from the 1960s to open the Amazon frontier through road construction and development projects.

Medicine

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Enzyme, S. scabies, scabies, potato scabs, toxin removal, 5naa, 5NAA-A, thaxtomin, Pollutants, Bradyrhizobium , Bacteria, Nature Chemical Biology, aminohydrolase, protein crystals, Protein Crystallography, Metalloproteases, Teacher, STEM awards, STEM careers

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Oct-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Science

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Hearing, Vision, Reproduction, Brain Activitiy, Biology, Insects, Pharmacology, laboratory technology

Penetrable Armor

Insects are tough animals to study. One reason is their armor-like coating, called an exoskeleton, which protects their organs. Researchers have discovered a technique to open the exoskeleton in order to study living organs and cells. Results published in the journal Frontiers in Physiology.

Science

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Artificial Intelligence, Georgia Insitute of Technology

Big Data NSF Grant to Address Environmental Challenges

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Soon scientists and the public will have the chance to easily test hypotheses about America’s ecological challenges with the help of an ensemble of technologies, including artificial intelligence.

Medicine

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Origins Of Life, primordial world, DNA world, RNA World hypothesis

News From the Primordial World

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A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) offers a twist on a popular theory for how life on Earth began about four billion years ago.

Science

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Rat, Rodent

Wireless, Freely Behaving Rodent Cage Helps Scientists Collect More Reliable Data

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The EnerCage (Energized Cage) system is created for scientific experiments on awake, freely behaving small animals. It wirelessly powers electronic devices and sensors traditionally used during rodent research experiments, but without the use of interconnect wires or bulky batteries. Their goal is to create as natural an environment within the cage as possible for mice and rats in order for scientists to obtain consistent and reliable results.

Science

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Snake Venom Composition Could Be Related to Hormones and Diet

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Many people are afraid of snakes, but scientists are now revealing insights about their venoms that could give even ophidiophobes an appreciation for the animals. One team has found that the proteins from the venom gland can vary depending on age and gender. These findings, reported in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, suggest that hormonal and dietary influences are at play.

Science

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Forbidden Fruit a Fatal Temptation for Grizzly Bears in Southeastern British Columbia: Human Settlement and Abundant Fruit Create Ecological Trap for the Apex Omnivore

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With its rustic small mountain towns, postcard-perfect vistas, and abundance of “pow” days, British Columbia’s East Kootenay region has an undeniable lure for outdoor enthusiasts of all varieties—and the appeal extends beyond ski bums and hikers. The resource-rich Elk Valley (including the towns of Jaffray, Fernie, Elkford, and Sparwood) is also a highly desirable home for wildlife like grizzly bears which are drawn to the area’s bountiful fruit supply.

Science

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Conservation, conservation corridor, Biodiversity

Optimization Technique Identifies Cost-Effective Biodiversity Corridors

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A new optimization technique could help conservation biologists choose the most cost-effective ways of connecting isolated populations of rare, threatened and endangered species living in protected areas.

Science

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Missing Fish Catch Data? Not Necessarily a Problem, New Study Says

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A new study by University of Washington scientists finds that in many cases, misreporting caught fish doesn’t always translate to overfishing. The study was published online this month in the journal Fish and Fisheries.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Texas Tech University, Climate Science, President Barack Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio, White House, Climate Change, Politico, Sierra Club, Public Broadcasting System

Katharine Hayhoe Talks Climate Change with President Obama and Leonardo DiCaprio, Accepts Awards, Kicks Off New PBS Series

One of the world’s leading climate scientists talks about her passion with the President of the United States and one of Hollywood’s biggest stars in front of millions of people on the heels of yet another major honor and the premiere of her new PBS Digital Series.

Science

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Consistency Builds Cohesion in the Animal Kingdom

Oscar Wilde may have considered consistency “the last refuge of the unimaginative” in human behaviour, but when it comes to fish, the element of predictability is critical. Such are the findings of new research led by the University of Bristol, which reveals that fish with consistent personalities are more successful in social groups and better at helping to build tighter shoals.

Science

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Marine Ecology, crustaceans, Climate Change, Sexual Selection, mating behavior

Climate change will see some males get sexier

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A common marine crustacean has shown researchers that it’s all set to beat climate change – the males will get more attractive to the females, with a resulting population explosion.

Science

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Energy, Environment, Fundamental Science, Hydropower, Green Energy, Marine Research, Biology, fish

Powered for Life: Self-Charging Tag Tracks Fish as Long as They Swim

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A self-powered fish-tracking tag uses a flexible strip containing piezoelectric materials to emit tiny beeps that are recorded by underwater microphones. The device is designed for longer-living fish such as sturgeon, eels and lamprey.

Science

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winter wheat breeding, yield gains, Disease Resistance, Oahe winter wheat, South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, South Dakota Wheat Commission, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Wheat Barley Scab Initiative, South Dakota State University

New Winter Wheat Variety Offers High Yields, Disease Resistance

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High yields and an excellent disease resistance package—these are qualities producers can expect from Oahe, the new winter wheat cultivar released by the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. From 2013 to 2015, Oahe ranked No. 1 in mean grain yield among hard red winter wheat trials in the North Regional Performance Nurseries, which has test plots from northern Kansas through Montana and into Canada.

Science

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Rising Ocean Temperatures Threaten Baby Lobsters

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If water temperatures in the Gulf of Maine rise a few degrees by end of the century, it could mean trouble for lobsters and the industry they support. That’s according to newly published research conducted at the University of Maine Darling Marine Center and Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences.

Science

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Agriculture, Farmers, Fungal Infections, millet, Africa, South Asia, Plant Science

U of G Discovery May Benefit Farmers Worldwide

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University of Guelph plant scientists have shown for the first time how an ancient crop teams up with a beneficial microbe to protect against a devastating fungal infection, a discovery that may benefit millions of subsistence farmers and livestock in developing countries.

Science

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Ancestor of Arthropods Had the Mouth of a Penis Worm

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“The mouth is a spitting image of the Sarlacc from Star Wars,” says Bristol University’s Dr Jakob Vinther, referring to the beast with the gaping mouth in the sand dunes of Tatooine in the ‘Return of the Jedi’.

Science

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Agriculture, Climate Change, carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Greenhouse Gas, Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Counting Carbon on the Farm Topic of Symposium

Several solutions adaptable by agricultural systems to be discussed







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