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Medicine

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Hexokinase, peptidoglycan, F. Widjaja Foundation Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, David Underhill

Scientists Uncover the Way a Common Cell Enzyme Alerts the Body to Invading Bacteria

Biomedical investigators at Cedars-Sinai have identified an enzyme found in all human cells that alerts the body to invading bacteria and jump-starts the immune system. In their study, published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Cell, the investigators provide clues to unraveling some of the mysteries surrounding the human immune system, which defends the body against harmful microbes such as bacteria.

Medicine

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Nanoparticle That Mimics Salmonella Counteracts Chemotherapy Resistance, Protein’s Role in Cell Division, A Novel MRI Method, and MORE in the Cancer News Source

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Medicine

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AIDS, HIV, Genetics, Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Medicine And Health, Vaccines

Mutational Tug of War Over HIV's Disease-Inducing Potential

A study from Emory AIDS researchers shows how the expected disease severity when someone is newly infected by HIV reflects a balance between the virus' invisibility to the host's immune system and its ability to reproduce.

Science

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Guillain Barre Syndrome, Auto Immune, Demyelination, leukocyte traffiking

UAB Study Finds Potential Treatment Target for Guillain-Barré Syndrome

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Investigators at UAB have identified an intriguing potential treatment target for the most common form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. In a new study, the authors offer evidence of a crucial pathogenic role for a molecule that is associated with AIDP, the most common variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Science

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Inflammation, Imunology, Physiology, Scientific Meeting, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiology

Researchers Convene to Explore Role of Inflammation, Immune Response in Cardiovascular Disease

A growing body of research points to the involvement of inflammation and the immune system on the development of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular physiologists and immunologists will meet to explore how these mechanisms interact at the Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference in Westminster, Colo., on Aug. 24–27, 2016.

Science

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meth methamphetamine , Wound Healing, wound healing complications, Microbiology, Microbiology And Immunology, METH

Methamphetamine and Skin Wounds: NYIT Researcher Wins $431,000 NIH Grant to Study Immune Response Problems with Drug Use

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The National Institutes of Health has awarded Dr. Luis Martinez of New York Institute of Technology a $431,700 three-year grant to investigate, in mice, methamphetamine's effects on the underlying biological mechanisms that cause inflammation and impair wound healing. Martinez hopes his findings can form the foundation for new studies on human subjects that might lead to targeted prevention and wound management.

Medicine

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Vasculitis, Vasculitis Foundation, Autoimmune, Autoimmune Disease, VF, Kate Kinney, Monroe Clinic, ranulomatosis with polyangiitis, GPA, Joyce Kullman

Medical Professional Diagnoses Rare Disease; Receives the Vasculitis Foundation’s 2016 VF-RED Award

Monroe Clinic hospitalist, Kate Kinney, is one of three medical professionals to earn the 2016 Vasculitis Foundation V-RED Award honoring her early diagnosis of a rare, autoimmune vasculitis disease. Kinney and her team's early identification of the illness allowed the patient to begin critical treatment before any further organ damage could occur.

Medicine

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Great Hope for Immunotherapy

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In the late 1800s, William B. Coley created a concoction out of bacteria and injected it into cancer patients. The first patient treated with what became known as “Coley’s Toxins” — a 21-year-old man with an inoperable tumor — was cured of his cancer. Though that might not have been the very first foray into immunotherapy as cancer treatment, it certainly was one of the earliest. Coley spent decades studying how bacterial infections affected cancers, earning him the moniker of the “father of immunotherapy.” Since then, the field has come a long way.

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Leading Cancer Research Organizations to Host Cancer Immunotherapy Conference

Four leading cancer research organizations will host a conference dedicated to the latest in cancer immunotherapy.

Medicine

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Cancer, Lymphoma Research, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, University Of Louisville, Immunotherapy, chimeric antigen receptors, CD4 antibody, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Bone Marrow Transplantation

CAR T-Cells Targeting CD4 Protein Granted Orphan Drug Designation for Treatment of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

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A new drug therapy for peripheral T-cell lymphoma has been granted Orphan Drug Designation by the FDA and the University of Louisville will be the site of first-in-human study

Medicine

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Moon Shots Program, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Apollo

Moon Shots Program APOLLO Project Aims to Expose Cancer’s Evasive Action

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A study that indicates how advanced melanoma responds to an immunotherapy, published in Cancer Discovery, demonstrates a revolutionary approach from The University of Texas MD Anderson Moon Shots Program that relies on longitudinal sampling and deep molecular analyses to understand the dynamics of cancer response to treatment.

Medicine

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Melanoma, Biopsies, Clinical Trials, Immunology, Immunotherapy

Immune Analysis of on-Treatment Longitudinal Biopsies Predicts Response to Melanoma Immunotherapy

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Immune response measured in tumor biopsies during the course of early treatment predicts which melanoma patients will benefit from specific immune checkpoint blockade drugs, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cancer Discovery.

Medicine

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Focused Ultrasound, media advisory, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Alzheimer's Disease, Essential Tremor, Parkinson's Disease, Epilepsy, Brain Tumor, Prostate, Prostate Cancer, immunotheraphy, Pancreatic Cancer, Breast Cancer, Soft Tissue Tumors, Arthritis, Neuropathic Pain, HIFU, Brain

Briefing on Clinical Advances in Focused Ultrasound

A briefing featuring short presentations on key data shared at the 5th International Symposium on Focused Ultrasound. Experts will highlight clinical outcomes and advances in the use of focused ultrasound – a non-invasive therapeutic technology – to treat brain disorders, cancers, pain and hypertension. A Q&A and opportunity for interviews will follow.

Medicine

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T Cells, checkpoint inhibitors, driver mutations , Immunotherapy, Immunotherapies, Phil Greenberg, CD8+ T cells, killer t cells, pembroluzimab, Keytruda, Fred Hutch, Andrea Schietinger, cell silencing

Killer T Cells Recognize Cancer in Pre-Clinical Tumors, but Are Silenced as Tumor Develops

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A new study in mice suggests that in a tumor’s pre-clinical stages, long before a human tumor would be clinically recognizable, certain immune cells can recognize changes that make these cells behave as cancerous cells and attempt to launch an immune attack. However, the T cells that are recognizing these “driver” mutations in the tumor are rapidly turned off and then permanently silenced, making the cells non-functional and thereby protecting the tumor from an immune attack. If researchers can find a way to reverse that silencing, the tumor-recognizing T cells could be rescued and could potentially improve the performance of certain immunotherapies, including that of so-called checkpoint inhibitor drugs that release some of cancer’s brakes on the immune system.

Medicine

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Ebola, Immunology, Vaccines, antibody deficiency, Drug Coated Stents, ZMapp, Structural Biology, cryo-electron microscopy

TSRI Scientists Pinpoint Ebola’s Weak Spots

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute now have a high-resolution view of exactly how the experimental therapy ZMapp targets Ebola virus.

Medicine

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Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Cell Biology, Medicine & Health, Neurobiology

Seasonal Allergies Could Change Your Brain

Hay fever may do more than give you a stuffy nose and itchy eyes, seasonal allergies may change the brain, says a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.

Medicine

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Cancer, Leukemia, Immunotherapy, CAR-T-cell, patient story, Clinical Trial

Leukemia in Remission for First Patient to Undergo CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy in San Diego

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Robert Legaspi was 9 years old when he was first diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This year, at age 27, his leukemia returned for the fourth time. This time was different, though — on May 20, 2016, Legaspi became the first patient in San Diego to receive a new type of immunotherapy, known as CAR T-cell therapy, as part of a Phase I/II clinical trial at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health.

Medicine

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Asthma, Immune System, Innate Immune System, Innate Immune Response, Innate Immunity, Microbes, Neutrophils, Eosiniphils, dust

Growing Up on an Amish Farm Protects Children Against Asthma by Reprogramming Immune Cells

By probing the differences between two farming communities, an interdisciplinary team of researchers found that substances in the house dust from Amish, but not Hutterite, homes is associated with changes to immune cells that appear to protect children from developing asthma.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Memory Loss, Immune System

Iowa State Study Suggests ‘Use It or Lose It’ to Defend Against Memory Loss

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Iowa State University researchers have identified a protein essential for building memories that appears to predict the progression of memory loss and brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s patients. Their findings suggest there is a link between brain activity and the presence of this protein.

Medicine

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Neurobiolgy, Medicine & Health

New Cause of Immune Neuropathy Discovered

Patients suffering from so-called immune-mediated neuropathies frequently have a long medical record. As there are no diagnostic tests available to reliably diagnose the disease, the diagnosis is frequently made belatedly and patients can be misdiagnosed. Accordingly, many years often pass before an effective therapy is started. However, not all patients respond to first-choice drugs even when treated immediately.







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