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Newswise: Data scientists in Chicago fill in gaps on race, ethnicity in COVID-19 testing
Released: 26-Oct-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Data scientists in Chicago fill in gaps on race, ethnicity in COVID-19 testing
DePaul University

Thousands of people are being tested for COVID-19 each day, but collecting complete demographic information, including race and ethnicity, has proven difficult. Data science researchers at DePaul University have stepped up in Chicago to help public health officials fill in this missing information.

Newswise: Safety and prevention are priority for Penn State Health as COVID-19 pandemic continues
Released: 26-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Safety and prevention are priority for Penn State Health as COVID-19 pandemic continues
Penn State Health

The number of new daily cases of COVID-19 is rising sharply statewide – and the trend is reflected in central Pennsylvania and in Penn State Health’s hospitals and outpatient clinics. As the increase is not unexpected, care teams across Penn State Health remain prepared to provide care for all patients who need it – whether for COVID or any other health issue.

Newswise: Ultrasounds Show Impact of COVID-19 on the Heart
22-Oct-2020 9:35 AM EDT
Ultrasounds Show Impact of COVID-19 on the Heart
Mount Sinai Health System

International study may guide therapeutic strategies in patients with and without underlying heart conditions

Newswise: Can Scientists take the STING out of Common Respiratory Viruses?
Released: 26-Oct-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Can Scientists take the STING out of Common Respiratory Viruses?
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC-Chapel Hill scientists discovered that many rhinoviruses need a human protein called STING to make copies of its RNA, opening the door to a new strategy for controlling infection of these pesky and at times very dangerous pathogens.

Newswise: DFW COVID-19 Prevalence Study Expands
Released: 26-Oct-2020 12:20 PM EDT
DFW COVID-19 Prevalence Study Expands
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Key Points: - As North Texas braces for a second COVID wave and flu season, a major COVID-19 study by UT Southwestern and Texas Health Resources is expanding. - The study is expanding from its original invitation-only format to offer more members of Dallas and Tarrant County communities a chance to participate. - Testing in the study is still free and includes testing for active and past infections.

Newswise: Estimating Risk of Airborne COVID-19 with Mask Usage, Social Distancing
Released: 26-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Estimating Risk of Airborne COVID-19 with Mask Usage, Social Distancing
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In Physics of Fluids, researchers used a model to understand airborne transmission that is designed to be accessible to a wide range of people, including nonscientists. Employing concepts of fluid dynamics and factors in airborne transmission, they propose the Contagion Airborne Transmission inequality model. While not all factors may be known, it can still be used to assess relative risks. The researchers determined protection from transmission increases with physical distancing in an approximately linear proportion.

Released: 26-Oct-2020 7:00 AM EDT
New York City’s Coronavirus Outbreak Spread from More European Sources Than First Reported
NYU Langone Health

The COVID-19 pandemic started earlier than previously thought in New York City and Long Island by dozens of people infected mostly with strains from Europe. A new analysis also shows that most of the spread was within the community, as opposed to coming from people who had traveled.

21-Oct-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Model Predicts Likelihood of Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis in Patients with COVID-19
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• In a recent study, a new algorithm achieved good performance for predicting which hospitalized patients will develop acute kidney injury requiring dialysis. • Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19–October 25.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Woman recovering from COVID-19 shares experience as monoclonal antibody clinical trial participant
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When Christina Loville tested positive for the coronavirus, she was terrified. She decided to channel her fear into researching COVID-19 treatments, where she discovered a local clinical trial led by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released: 23-Oct-2020 4:30 PM EDT
"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT
Newswise

"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT

Released: 23-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Are we really “rounding the corner" when it comes the coronavirus pandemic?
Newswise

“We’re rounding the turn,” Trump said during the debate. This implies a meaningful improvement. We rate this claim as false. On that very same day the U.S. recorded 77,000 new cases, according to NBC News. This tops the previous high that had been set in July. We may be learning to "live with it," as Trump mentioned, but this is not an improvement.

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Released: 23-Oct-2020 12:50 PM EDT
NRL researchers evaluate ultraviolet sources, combat COVID-19
United States Naval Research Laboratory

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory researchers evaluated commercial ultraviolet (UV) sources for viral disinfection to combat COVID-19 on land and at sea, and established a dedicated UV characterization lab in five days to ensure safe introduction and effective operation of UV sources across the Fleet.

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Released: 23-Oct-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Eliminating COVID-19: What the world can learn from NZ and Taiwan
University of Otago

Both Taiwan and New Zealand have successfully eliminated COVID-19 with world-leading pandemic responses. By taking a particularly proactive approach, Taiwan's response was probably the most effective and least disruptive of any country's, researchers say.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Healthcare's earthquake: Lessons from COVID-19
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally disrupted U.S. healthcare organizations.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT
New Data on Increasing Cloth Mask Effectiveness
Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

A new study published in Risk Analysis, “Reinventing cloth masks in the face of pandemics,” by Stephen Salter, P.Eng., describes how Effective Fiber Mask Programs (EFMPs) can help communities find a balance between the economy and curbing community spread.

Newswise: Research Team Discovers the Molecular Processes in Kidney Cells That Attract and Feed COVID-19
Released: 23-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Research Team Discovers the Molecular Processes in Kidney Cells That Attract and Feed COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

What about the kidneys make them a hotspot for COVID-19’s cytokine storm? A research team says it’s the presence of a protein found on specialized renal transport cells.

Newswise: Landmark Study Suggests Malaria-Preventive Drugs Dramatically Reduce Infections and Improve Health of School Children
21-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Landmark Study Suggests Malaria-Preventive Drugs Dramatically Reduce Infections and Improve Health of School Children
University of Maryland Medical Center

Use of preventive antimalarial treatments reduces by half the number of malaria infections among schoolchildren, according to a new analysis published today in The Lancet Global Health.

Newswise: New Landmark Study at UM School of Medicine Finds Aspirin Use Reduces Risk of Death in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
Released: 22-Oct-2020 2:40 PM EDT
New Landmark Study at UM School of Medicine Finds Aspirin Use Reduces Risk of Death in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
University of Maryland Medical Center

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients who were taking a daily low-dose aspirin to protect against cardiovascular disease had a significantly lower risk of complications and death compared to those who were not taking aspirin, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Released: 22-Oct-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Tocilizumab doesn't ease symptoms or prevent death in moderately ill COVID-19 inpatients
Massachusetts General Hospital

The drug tocilizumab (Actemra) does not reduce the need for breathing assistance with mechanical ventilation or prevent death in moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a new study led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

Released: 22-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that nursing homes "never needed" to accept patients who tested positive for COVID-19, but they did accept them
Newswise

According to a report from the New York State Department of Health, "6,326 COVID-positive residents were admitted to [nursing home] facilities" following Cuomo's mandate that nursing homes accept the readmission of COVID-positive patients from hospitals. Therefore we rate his claim as false.

Released: 22-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
U of M trial shows hydroxychloroquine does not prevent COVID-19 in health care workers
University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota Medical School physician researchers studied hydroxychloroquine as a treatment to prevent COVID-19 for those with high-risk for exposure to the virus - health care workers.

Newswise: UNLV Physician: Why COVID-19 Makes Flu Shots More Important Than Ever
Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
UNLV Physician: Why COVID-19 Makes Flu Shots More Important Than Ever
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

As the race for a COVID-19 vaccine intensifies, health care officials are reminding the public not to forget another important vaccine this fall: the flu shot. Flu season in the U.S. technically began in September, with illnesses expected to peak in December and February, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Less than half of Americans received a flu vaccine during the 2019-2020 flu season, and a staggering 405,000 hospitalizations and 22,000 deaths were attributed to influenza.

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Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Immune response the probable underlying cause of neural damage in COVID-19
University of Gothenburg

It is probably the immune response to, rather than the virus in itself, that causes sudden confusion and other symptoms from the nervous system in some patients with COVID-19. This is shown by a study of cases involving six Swedish patients, now published in the journal Neurology.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian CDI, University of Michigan Demonstrate Better, Faster COVID-19 Antibody Testing
Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Hackensack Meridian CDI, University of Michigan Demonstrate Better, Faster COVID-19 Antibody Testing
Hackensack Meridian Health

A new portable “lab on a chip,” developed by the U-M scientists and demonstrated with help of the CDI, can identify the presence of COVID-19 antibodies in blood donors with greater speed and efficiency

Newswise: COVID-19 infection may be part of a ‘perfect storm’ for Parkinson’s disease
Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:00 PM EDT
COVID-19 infection may be part of a ‘perfect storm’ for Parkinson’s disease
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Oct. 22, 2020) — Can COVID-19 infection increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease?

Released: 22-Oct-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Do Asymptomatic Kids with COVID-19 Carry Less Virus?
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

New questions are at the forefront as a study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology from nine children’s hospitals finds that most asymptomatic children who tested positive for COVID-19 had relatively low levels of the virus compared to symptomatic children. The authors caution that the reason for this finding is unclear and more questions need to be answered. Were the asymptomatic children generally tested later in their disease, and were their viral loads potentially higher closer to the beginning of their infections? If tested early in disease, would asymptomatic children have viral loads as high as symptomatic children? Or do asymptomatic children typically not carry as much virus as children with symptoms? If so, how would lower viral loads impact the risk of transmission? These questions are essential to further clarify the public health impact of pediatric COVID-19.

Released: 22-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Key details about broadly neutralizing antibodies provide insights for universal flu vaccine
University of Chicago Medical Center

New research from an immunology team at the University of Chicago may shed light on the challenges of developing a universal flu vaccine that would provide long-lasting and broad protection against influenza viruses.

Released: 22-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT
A video posted by a European-based group called World Doctors Alliance falsely claims the novel coronavirus is “a normal flu virus”
Newswise

A video posted by a European-based group called World Doctors Alliance claims the novel coronavirus is “a normal flu virus” and there is no COVID-19 pandemic. Although the video was removed from Youtube, portions of the video are circulating on Facebook. We rate this claim as false. Scientists universally agree that the cuase of this pandemic is a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and not a strain of influenza. COVID-19 is deadlier than the seasonal flu. COVID-19 so far has killed more people in the U.S. than the past five flu seasons combined.

Released: 22-Oct-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Black individuals bear heavy burden of COVID-19 mortality, but key geographic disparities in health determinants exist
University of Alabama at Birmingham

A new study published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality & Outcomes by University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers showed that Black individuals have a disproportionately higher COVID-19 mortality burden across all of the United States, which is driven by a high incidence of COVID-19 infection. They found that there are key geographic differences in the distribution of health determinants and COVID-19 mortality patterns.

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Embargo will expire: 27-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Oct-2020 9:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: The Medical Minute: The three types of COVID-19 tests
Released: 22-Oct-2020 8:10 AM EDT
The Medical Minute: The three types of COVID-19 tests
Penn State Health

Eight months into the COVID-19 pandemic, questions about testing abound. With COVID-19 cases trending upward, it’s important to understand when individuals should seek getting tested and what type of test they should have.

Newswise:Video Embedded your-guide-to-a-covid-19-vaccine-what-the-public-needs-to-know
VIDEO
Released: 22-Oct-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Your guide to a COVID-19 vaccine: What the public needs to know
Keck Medicine of USC

Edward Jones-Lopez, MD, MS, a Keck Medicine of USC infectious diseases expert and investigator of one of the Operation Warp Speed vaccine clinical trials, answers the questions on everyone’s mind.

Released: 22-Oct-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Study Helps Explain Declines in Death Rates from COVID-19
NYU Langone Health

Fewer New Yorkers are dying from the coronavirus than health experts had anticipated, a new study shows. Regional death rates have dropped from the highs seen at the start of the outbreak, partially due to a shift in the population contracting the disease toward those who are more resilient.

20-Oct-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Analyzing web searches can help experts predict, respond to COVID-19 hot spots
Mayo Clinic

Web-based analytics have demonstrated their value in predicting the spread of infectious disease, and a new study from Mayo Clinic indicates the value of analyzing Google web searches for keywords related to COVID-19.

Newswise: Covid-19 Interventions Can Cut Virus Infections, Severe Outcomes, and Healthcare Needs
Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Covid-19 Interventions Can Cut Virus Infections, Severe Outcomes, and Healthcare Needs
Georgia Institute of Technology

Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as voluntary shelter-in-place, quarantines, and other steps taken to control the SARS-CoV-2 virus can reduce the peak number of infections, daily infection rates, cumulative infections, and overall deaths, a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has found.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Viral Facebook image does not show a coronavirus testing patent was submitted in 2015
Newswise

A post of an image showing "evidence" of a patent application for a novel coronavirus test in 2015 by a person named Richard A. Rothschild was shared by hundreds of users. This claim is false. The image shows a supplemental application that was filed in 2020 following the submission of another patent application in 2015 that was not related to the coronavirus. A spokesperson for the financial services firm Rothschild & Co. said the patent’s applicant had no link to the company.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
University of Edinburgh

Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for Covid-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests.

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Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Observed COVID-19 variability may have underlying molecular sources
University of California, Riverside

People have different susceptibilities to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, and develop varying degrees of fever, fatigue, and breathing problems -- common symptoms of the illness. What might explain this variation?

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Hospitals Leaned Toward Strict COVID-19 NICU Policies Despite Low Prevalence of Infection, New Study Finds
George Washington University

Two studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) found the prevalence of COVID-19 in NICU infants is low, yet many hospitals at the start of the pandemic put in place strict parental visitation policies and scaled back NICU services such as lactation support and therapy.

Newswise: Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 Virus with Genome Sequencing
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 Virus with Genome Sequencing
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Dirk Dittmer, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, is tracking the virus that causes COVID-19 by sequencing the genome of virus samples collected from diagnostic testing. Using next generation sequencing on SARS-CoV-2 will help accurately diagnose the novel coronavirus, identify mutations and track its history.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Rutgers Pediatricians Sound Alarm on Decreased Flu Vaccinations, Immunizations for Children
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Two Rutgers New Jersey Medical School pediatricians discuss the importance of keeping children and adults up to date with immunizations during the coronavirus crisis.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Americans’ Responses to Covid-19 Stay-Home Orders Differed According to Population Density
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Americans strongly reduced their visits to grocery stores, pharmacies, and transit stations following stay-at-home orders from mayors and governors earlier this year, but did not reduce their visits to parks and beaches.

Released: 20-Oct-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Nearly a Quarter of New York City Transit Workers Report Having Had COVID-19
New York University

A survey of New York City’s bus and subway workers finds that 24 percent report having contracted COVID-19 and 90 percent fear getting sick at work. The pilot study, conducted by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, in coordination with the Transport Workers Union (TWU) Local 100, helps document the toll the pandemic has taken on the physical and mental health of essential workers.

Released: 20-Oct-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Safety Considerations for Visiting Primary Care Doctors
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The COVID-19 pandemic has left many people with chronic health conditions relying on telemedicine rather than seeing their doctor in person when necessary or putting off important visits entirely because they fear being infected. Ann M. Nguyen, an assistant research professor at Rutgers Center for State Health Policy at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, who recently published a paper on safety measures at physician offices, discusses what people should know about visiting their doctor and why putting off appointments that need to be done in person could lead to other health problems.

Released: 20-Oct-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers discovered the second 'key' used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus to enter into human cells
University of Helsinki

To efficiently infect human cells, SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is able to use a receptor called Neuropilin-1, which is very abundant in many human tissues including the respiratory tract, blood vessels and neurons. The breakthrough discovery was made by a German-Finnish team of researchers led by neuroscientists Mika Simons ,Technical University of Munich, Germany and virologist Giuseppe Balistreri, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Released: 20-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Population currently sees coronavirus as the greatest health risk
BFR Federal Institute For Risk Assessment

Next on the list of concerns, though notably less frequently mentioned, are unhealthy or wrong diet as well as climate and environmental pollution - these were the most frequently mentioned concerns in February's survey. "The coronavirus pandemic dominates public perception", says BfR President Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel.

Released: 20-Oct-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Trump Mocked Biden for Saying He'll ‘Listen to the Scientists’
Newswise

U.S. President Donald Trump emphasized his stark contrast to his opponent Joe Biden in dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic when he mocked Biden for saying he'll "listen to scientists."


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