Curated News:

Featured: MedWire

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

epigenetic age, molecular changes, DNA, Life Expectancy, Aging, biological aging marker, Lifespan, Internal Clock

Epigenetic Clock Predicts Life Expectancy

SuperStock_oldermanyoga.jpg

Why do some people lead a perfectly healthy lifestyle yet still die young? A new international study suggests that the answer lies in our DNA.

Medicine

Channels:

Stent, Stroke, Stroke Center, SWIFT PRIME trial, Blood Clot, Acute Ischemic Stroke, time to treatment, when to treat

Time Window to Help People Who’Ve Had a Stroke Longer Than Previously Shown

SaverBeforeThrombectomy.jpg

Time is of the essence when getting people stricken with acute ischemic strokes to treatment. And the use of stent retrievers — devices that remove the blood clot like pulling a cork out of a wine bottle Current professional guidelines recommend that stent retrievers be used to remove blood clots from stroke patients within six hours for people to benefit. But new research finds that the procedure has benefits for people up to 7.3 hours following the onset of a stroke.

Medicine

Channels:

Duke Health, Endocrinology, Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases, Fatty Liver Disease, Fructose, sugar intake, Molecular Physiology, Chrebp

New Theory on How Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Disease Begin

Does eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes? The answer may not be simple, but a study published Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation adds to growing research linking excessive sugar consumption -- specifically the sugar fructose -- to a rise in metabolic disease worldwide. The study, conducted in mice and corroborated in human liver samples, unveils a metabolic process that could upend previous ideas about how the body becomes resistant to insulin and eventually develops diabetes.

Medicine

Channels:

Hearing Loss, Pregnancy, Premature Birth, Low Birth Weight, Birth Outcomes, maternal hearing loss, American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Women with Hearing Loss More Likely to Have Preterm or Low Birth Weight Babies

AJPMDec16MitraImage.JPG

Hearing loss is a marginalizing and disabling condition, resulting in various adverse social and health outcomes. Babies born to women with hearing loss were significantly more likely to be premature and have low birth weight, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Understanding and addressing the causes are critical to improving pregnancy outcomes among women with hearing loss, say investigators.

Medicine

Channels:

drug deliver, Tumor, Cancer, magnetic bacteria

Swarms of Magnetic Bacteria Could Be Used to Deliver Drugs to Tumors

Magneticbacteriaillustration.jpg

Researchers have recently shown that magnetic bacteria are a promising vehicle for more efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs.

Medicine

Channels:

Stem Cells, Animal Research, Animal Studies, Heart, Heart Cells, Medicine

Stem Cell ‘Heart Patch’ Moves Closer to Clinic

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional “heart patches” in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients.

Medicine

Channels:

Sleep Disorders, Sleep, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Steven Bender, Night Terrors, dreaming

Sleep Paralysis: Fully Awake and Unable to Move

SleepParalysis.jpg

Your eyes begin to open after a good night of sleep, but something feels weird. You try to take a deep breath but can’t draw air. You can’t sit up, and you may even see a shadow in the corner of the room. This isn’t a nightmare or a medical emergency—you likely just had a case of sleep paralysis.

Medicine

Channels:

Neurology, Brain, Animal Research, Nerves, Neurons

Study Finds a Key to Nerve Regeneration

svarennervegrowth.png

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a switch that redirects helper cells in the peripheral nervous system into "repair" mode, a form that restores damaged axons.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Fat, Sugar, AML, Prostate Cancer

Taste for Fat

AchillesHeel-MHagis_120.jpg.jpeg

Most cancers have a sweet tooth but—mysteriously—some tumors prefer fat over sugar. Now, a study from Harvard Medical School reveals how these cancers develop their appetite for fat.

Medicine

Channels:

Survey: Half of Kids in Families Studied Spend Time in Households with Firearms

gunrelease.jpg

A study of parents by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that about half of the children whose parents were surveyed spend time in homes that have firearms.

Medicine

Channels:

Stem Cells, Chronic Kidney Disease, atheroscleroisis, Cardiovascular Disease, osteoblasts

Scientists Find Culprit Responsible for Calcified Blood Vessels in Kidney Disease

stemcells.jpg

Scientists have implicated a type of stem cell in the calcification of blood vessels that is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The research will guide future studies into ways to block minerals from building up inside blood vessels and exacerbating atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries.

Medicine

Channels:

Asthma, Children, kids, Acetaminophen, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, advil, clinical trial

Acetaminophen Not Associated with Worse Asthma in Kids

Sickgirlwiththermometer_1.jpeg

Children with mild, persistent asthma did not have worse asthma symptoms after taking acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol) for pain or fever, compared to using ibuprofen (e.g., Advil), according to the results of a randomized, double-blind clinical trial recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Chemotheraphy, adjuvant therapies

Study Finds Potential New Biomarker for Cancer Patient Prognosis

chromosome650.jpg

Berkeley Lab researchers linked the overexpression of 14 genes related to cell division to cancer patients' prognosis and response to specific treatments. The findings could be used to develop a biomarker that doctors and patients use to make better informed decisions in clinical settings.

Medicine

Channels:

tissue-engineered liver, Progenitor Cells

Functional Human Tissue-Engineered Liver Generated From Stem and Progenitor Cells

humanTeli-1.jpg

A research team at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has generated functional human and mouse tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells. Tissue-engineered Liver (TELi) was found to contain normal structural components such as hepatocytes, bile ducts and blood vessels.

Medicine

Channels:

Atmospheric Science (Climate; Pollution/Remediation), Toxicology, Public Health, Cardiology, Health Care

Latest Research Reveals Sitting in Traffic Jams Is Officially Bad for You

122571_web.jpg

With millions of motorists set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution. Latest research from the University of Surrey has shown that simple adjustment to your car's ventilation system while sitting in traffic jams can greatly affect your exposure to toxic fumes by up to 76%.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Neuroscience, Brain, Memory & Cognitive Processes, Hippocampus, Reward-based learning, place cells

The Brain Uses Backward Instant Replays to Remember Important Travel Routes

IMG_1925_sq.jpg

Neuroscientists believe they have figured out how rats solve certain navigational problems. If there’s a “reward” at the end of the trip, specialized neurons in the hippocampus of the brain “replay” the route taken to get it, but backward. And the greater the reward, the more often the rats’ brains replay it.

Medicine

Business

Channels:

GBSI, Global Biological Standards Institute , Leonard P. Freedman, PhD, Freedman, Antibody, Antibody Validation, Reproducibility, irreproducibility, Replicable , Biomedical Research

GBSI Antibody Validation Workshop Gathers Key Stakeholder Groups at Asilomar To Find Actionable Solutions for Improving Reproducibility in Research

antibody-validation-2.jpg

The Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) targets the quality of research antibodies at a workshop at Asilomar next month in its ongoing efforts to improve reproducibility in preclinical research. Antibody Validation: Standards, Policies, and Practices brings together 100 leaders representing academia, antibody producers, pharma, funders, journals and policy makers to share perspectives, build consensus and recommend actionable solutions for improving accuracy in research antibody usage and validation. It is the first convening of all such stakeholder groups with the express purpose of developing antibody standards.

Medicine

Channels:

Bacteriology, Microbiology, Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Inflammation, Autoimmune Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cytokines

Flesh-Eating Infections in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Spur New Discovery

Rheumatoid arthritis patients taking medications that inhibit interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a molecule that stimulates the immune system, are 300 times more likely to experience invasive Group A Streptococcal infections than patients not on the drug, according to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers. Their study, published August 19 in Science Immunology, also uncovers a critical new role for IL-1beta as the body’s independent early warning system for bacterial infections.

Medicine

Channels:

Norovirus, Animal Models

New Clues Found to How “Cruise-Ship” Virus Gets Inside Cells

Norovirus10708crop.jpg

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the protein that norovirus – the most common cause of viral diarrhea – uses to invade cells. The discovery could lead to new ways to study the virus, which has been hard to study because it grows poorly in the lab.

Medicine

Channels:

pain, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Opioid Addiction, opioid overdose, drug developmnt

Researchers Develop Safer Opioid Painkiller From Scratch

An international team of researchers has developed a new opioid drug candidate that blocks pain without triggering the dangerous side effects of current prescription painkillers. Their secret? Starting from scratch — with computational techniques that let them explore more than four trillion different chemical interactions.







Chat now!