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High-Dose Vitamin D Not Effective for Helping Women with Repeat Reproductive Tract Infections

Vitamin D appears not to be effective for treating repeat occurrences of bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common reproductive infection among women worldwide. While earlier studies have shown a correlation between low vitamin D levels and BV, new research shows the difficult-to-treat and frequently symptom-free reproductive infection isn’t altered by high dose vitamin D supplements. The findings underscore the need to confirm findings from observational studies through randomized controlled trials. Effective treatments for recurrent BV are urgently needed, because BV can cause spontaneous abortions and increase the risk of contracting HIV.

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Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

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A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.

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New Insight on Why People with Down Syndrome Invariably Develop Alzheimer’s Disease

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Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The findings support a novel approach to treating and preventing both diseases.

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Changes at the Grocery Store Could Turn the Burden of Shopping with Children on Its Head

Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods – and parents often giving in – could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way. A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that this dynamic is particularly frustrating for caregivers on limited budgets who are trying to save money and make healthy meals.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Oct-2014 2:00 PM EDT

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Highly Effective New Anti-Cancer Drug Shows Few Side Effects in Mice

A new drug, OTS964, can eradicate aggressive human lung cancers transplanted into mice. It inhibits the action of a protein that is overproduced by several tumor types but is rarely expressed in healthy adult tissues. Without it, cancer cells fail to complete the cell-division process and die.

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Scientists Restore Hearing in Noise-Deafened Mice, Pointing Way to New Therapies

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Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

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Males with IBS Report More Social Stress Than Females

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One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition.

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Genetic Variant Protects Some Latina Women from Breast Cancer

An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer.

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First Step: From Human Cells to Tissue-Engineered Esophagus

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In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells.

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