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Bacteriology, Microbiology, Infectious Diseases, Immunology, Inflammation, Autoimmune Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cytokines

Flesh-Eating Infections in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Spur New Discovery

Rheumatoid arthritis patients taking medications that inhibit interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a molecule that stimulates the immune system, are 300 times more likely to experience invasive Group A Streptococcal infections than patients not on the drug, according to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers. Their study, published August 19 in Science Immunology, also uncovers a critical new role for IL-1beta as the body’s independent early warning system for bacterial infections.

Medicine

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Norovirus, Animal Models

New Clues Found to How “Cruise-Ship” Virus Gets Inside Cells

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Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the protein that norovirus – the most common cause of viral diarrhea – uses to invade cells. The discovery could lead to new ways to study the virus, which has been hard to study because it grows poorly in the lab.

Medicine

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pain, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Opioid Addiction, opioid overdose, drug developmnt

Researchers Develop Safer Opioid Painkiller From Scratch

An international team of researchers has developed a new opioid drug candidate that blocks pain without triggering the dangerous side effects of current prescription painkillers. Their secret? Starting from scratch — with computational techniques that let them explore more than four trillion different chemical interactions.

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Preventive Medicine, cardiovascuar disease, sedentary behavior, Sedentary Lifestyle, Heart Disease, American Heart Association, Diabetes, Stroke, University of Alabama at Birmingham

‘Sit Less, Move More’ — Research Shows Sedentary Behavior Is Associated with Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in Adults

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Sedentary behavior — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more.

Medicine

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Disease In The Developing World, infectious and emerging disease, Medicine & Health, Public Health

New Map Details Threat of Zika Across Europe, US

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With Zika sparking anxiety at the Summer Olympic Games in Brazil, and now being transmitted in Florida through contact with mosquitoes, accurately mapping the distribution of the virus is increasingly urgent.

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medicine health, technology and engineering, Computer Science, Dream

TMS Differences Between Brain Activity of People Who Dream and People Who Do Not Dream

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Researchers from Aalto University and the University of Wisconsin utilised a TMS-EEG device, which combines transcranial magnetic stimulation and EEG, to examine how the brain activity of people in the restful non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is affected by whether they dream or do not dream.

Medicine

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University Of Utah, Clinical Trials, Translational Research, Center for Clinical and Translational Science

University of Utah Wins $25 Million NIH Grant to Find Ways to Improve Clinical Trials

The University of Utah joins Vanderbilt, Duke universities in effort to make clnical trials more efficient and get translational research into clinical use faster.

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Internet, Internet Access, Precision Medicine Initiative, Education, Poverty, Medical Research

Use of Internet in Medical Research May Hinder Recruitment of Minorities, Poor

A study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis concludes that as researchers turn to the internet to find study participants, current health-care disparities may persist. They found that getting individuals to go online was difficult, particularly if subjects didn't have high school educations, had incomes below the poverty line or were African-American.

Medicine

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aaic, Alzheimer's Disease

Resveratrol Appears to Restore Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Alzheimer’s Disease

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Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer’s patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers. The reduction in neuronal inflammation slowed the cognitive decline of patients, compared to a matching group of placebo-treated patients with the disorder.

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Antibodies Identified That Thwart Zika Virus Infection

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Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified antibodies capable of protecting against Zika virus infection, a significant step toward developing a vaccine, better diagnostic tests and possibly new antibody-based therapies.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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twitches, Sleep, Brain

What's Going on When Babies Twitch in Their Sleep?

University of Iowa researchers suspect that sleep twitches in human infants are linked to sensorimotor development. Read on to learn how new parents can contribute to their study.

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epigentics, Menopause, meythylation, Aging, Women, Insomnia, lack of sleep, Hormone Therapy, HRT

Hot News Flash! Menopause, Sleepless Nights Make Women’s Bodies Age Faster

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Two UCLA studies reveal that menopause--and the insomnia that often accompanies it --make women age faster.

Medicine

Science

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Brain Mapping, cortical parcellation, Cerebral Cortex

Map Provides Detailed Picture of How the Brain Is Organized

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A detailed new map by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis lays out the landscape of the human cerebral cortex. The map will accelerate progress in the study of brain diseases, as well as help to elucidate what makes us unique as a species.

Medicine

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Essential Tremor, Focused Ultrasound, Focused Ultrasound Foundation, Elias, Jeff Elias, Cancer, Movement Disorder, Movement Disorders, shaking, University Of Virginia, UVA, UVA School of Medicine, Medicine, Medical Research, medical breakthrough, Brain Surgery, Discovery, Noninvasive, surgical procedure, Clinical Trial, FDA, Food And Drug Administration, device

FDA Approves Scalpel-Free Brain Surgery for Tremor Pioneered at UVA

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor, the most common movement disorder, in patients who do not respond to medication. The scalpel-free approach has been pioneered by Jeff Elias, MD, at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, who led an international clinical trial that demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of the device.

Medicine

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Anorexia

Abnormalities Found in ‘Insight’ Areas of the Brain in Anorexia

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Abnormalities in brain regions involved in forming insight may help explain why some people with anorexia nervosa have trouble recognizing their dangerous, dysfunctional eating habits.

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Medication Costs Likely to Jump This Year

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Prescription medication costs are expected to rise at least 11 percent, and possibly up to 13 percent, in 2016, according to a new report on national trends and projections in prescription drug expenditures.

Medicine

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Osteoarthritis, Hip Replacement, Knee Replacement, Orthopaedic Surgery, Stem Cell Biology

Stem Cells Engineered to Grow Cartilage, Fight Inflammation

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. What’s more, using gene therapy, they have activated the new cartilage to release anti-inflammatory molecules to fend off a return of arthritis.

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Study: Fracking Industry Wells Associated with Increased Risk of Asthma Attacks

People with asthma who live near bigger or larger numbers of active unconventional natural gas wells operated by the fracking industry in Pennsylvania are 1.5 to four times likelier to have asthma attacks than those who live farther away, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Neuroscience, Research, Immune System, Brain, Brain Research, Social Behavior, Interaction, Social Interaction, Health, Brain Health, Behavior, Discovery, Schizophrenia, autism-spectrum disorder, Mental Health, Introversion, Extroversion, Extrovert, Introvert, Psychology, Behavioral Science, Kipnis, Jonathan Kipnis, Anthony Filiano, Filiano, Immunity, Pathogens, UVA

Freaky New Role Found for the Immune System: Controlling Social Interaction

Could immune system problems contribute to an inability to have normal social interactions? The answer appears to be yes, and that finding could have great implications for neurological conditions such as autism-spectrum disorders and schizophrenia.

Medicine

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Rhinovirus, cold, Asthma, Children, Respiratory, Viruses

UW, Purdue Scientists Solve Structure of Cold Virus Linked to Childhood Asthma

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The atomic structure of an elusive cold virus linked to severe asthma and respiratory infections in children has been solved by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Purdue University. The findings provide the foundation for future antiviral drug and vaccine development against the virus, rhinovirus C.







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