Curated News:

Featured: MedWire

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Canner, Suicide, Emergency, Injury

Attempted Suicide Rates and Risk Groups Essentially Unchanged, New Study Shows

Emergencyroom_Hospital_iStock-538726573SMALL.jpg

Johns Hopkins investigators report that their analysis of a national database representing more than 1 billion emergency department visits shows that over a recent eight-year period, nothing much has changed in the rates of unsuccessful suicide attempts, or in the age, gender, seasonal timing or means used by those who tried to take their lives in the United States.

Medicine

Channels:

Roland Griffiths, Cancer, Drugs, Anxiety, Psilocybin

Hallucinogenic Drug Psilocybin Eases Existential Anxiety in People with Life-Threatening Cancer

Peace_After_Cancer_Treatment_iStock_24282999SMALL.jpg

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms."

Medicine

Channels:

Parkinson's Disease, Gene Mutation

Gene Mutation Linked to Early Onset of Parkinson’s Disease in Caucasians

AurielWilletteHeadShot.jpg

A defect in a gene that produces dopamine in the brain appears to accelerate the onset of Parkinson’s disease, according to new research from Iowa State University. The effect is particularly dramatic for young-to-middle-age adults.

Medicine

Channels:

Breastfeeding, Womens Health, Maternal And Child Health, disparities in healthcare, Minority Health, Access To Care

Study Shows Alarming Disparities in Health Outcomes Could Be Prevented by Breastfeeding

disparities_graphic_2.jpg

Lack of paid leave and outdated maternity care are barriers to breastfeeding that disproportionately impact families of color. This is the first study to show how these disparities translate into differences in health outcomes.

Medicine

Channels:

Alzheimers disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's, Amyloid, Neuroscience, Biochemistry, brain blood vessel, Cognitive Impairment

Unique Structure of Brain Blood Vessel Amyloid Latest Clue to Alzheimer’s Development?

vascularamyloid.jpg

A team of neuroscience and biochemistry researchers at Stony Brook University have made a novel discovery that illustrates for the first time the difference between amyloid buildup in brain blood vessels and amyloid buildup around brain neurons.

Medicine

Channels:

Reflux and Ulcer Medications Linked to Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

• Individuals who took proton pump inhibitors or histamine receptor-2 blockers for heartburn, acid reflux, or ulcers had elevated risks of developing kidney stones. • In individuals without acute kidney injury, proton pump inhibitors were linked with a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease or kidney failure compared with histamine receptor-2 blockers. • Research that uncovered these findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15–20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

Medicine

Channels:

Pregnancy and Childbirth, Longevity, Aging, Gerontology, advanced maternal age, OB GYN

Older First-Time Mothers Are Also More Likely to Live Longer

The average age of a woman giving birth for the first time has risen dramatically in the United States over the past 40 years, driven by factors like education or career. A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that women choosing to become first-time mothers later in life may increase their chances of living into their 90s.

Medicine

Channels:

atrial fibrillation (AF), Dementia, intermountain medical center, American Heart Association, american heart association scientific sessions, Warfarin, Blood Clots, Medication, Heart Patients, Research & Development, Cardiovascular Research, intermountain healthcare, Jared Bunch, MD

Atrial Fibrillation Patients Are at Increased Risk of Dementia, Regardless of Anticoagulation Use

A-Fib.png

Atrial fibrillation patients who use the drug, warfarin, to prevent harmful blood clots from forming in their hearts to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than patients who use warfarin for non-atrial fibrillation conditions, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Mental Health, Mental Health and Climate Change, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Sunlight, Sunlight Exposure, Depression, Psychology, Physics, Statistics

Sunshine Matters a Lot to Mental Health; Temperature, Pollution, Rain Not So Much

Unknown-2.jpeg

Sunshine matters. A lot. The idea isn’t exactly new, but according to a recent study, when it comes to your mental and emotional health, the amount of time between sunrise and sunset is the weather variable that matters most.

Medicine

Channels:

Emulsifiers, Food Additive, processed foods, Intestinal Bacteria, intestinal inflammation , Colorectal Cancer, Colon Cancer, Microbiota

Common Food Additive Promotes Colon Cancer in Mice

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter intestinal bacteria in a manner that promotes intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, according to a new study.

Medicine

Channels:

B12, Deficiency, Endocrinology, Maternal, Diabetes, type-2

Maternal B12 Deficiency May Increase Child’s Risk of Type-2 Diabetes

saravan.png

B12 deficiency during pregnancy may predispose children to metabolic problems such as type-2 diabetes, according to research presented today at the Society for Endocrinology’s annual Conference in Brighton. These findings could lead to a review of current vitamin B12 requirements for pregnant women, whether through an improved diet or supplements.

Medicine

Channels:

Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation , Consciousness, Comatose, Arousal, Awareness, Michael D. Fox, MD, PhD

Insight Into the Seat of Human Consciousness

MichaelFox.jpg

For millennia, philosophers have struggled to define human consciousness. Now, a team of researchers led by neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has pinpointed the regions of the brain that may play a role maintaining it. Their findings, which have already garnered multiple awards from the American Academy of Neurology, were published today in that society’s journal, Neurology.

Medicine

Channels:

Stressed-Out Rats Consume More Alcohol, Revealing Related Brain Chemistry

DaniNeuroncellsimageNov16.jpg

Researchers found that rodents that had been exposed to stress had a weakened alcohol-induced dopamine response and voluntarily drank more alcohol compared to controls. The blunted dopamine signaling to ethanol arose due to changes in the circuitry in the ventral tegmental area, the heart of the brain's reward system.

Medicine

Channels:

Pet Scan, Alzheimer's Disease

Earlier Alzheimer’s Diagnosis May Be Possible with New Imaging Compound

Fluselenamyl-20minImageinTgMice.jpg

Researchers have developed a chemical compound that detects the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta better than current FDA-approved agents. The compound potentially could be used in brain scans to identify the signs of Alzheimer’s early, or to monitor response to treatment.

Medicine

Channels:

Endocrine Society, Contraception, male birth control, Men's Health, Contraceptive, Pregnancy, World Health Organization, Side Effects, Depression, Mental Health

Male Birth Control Shots Prevent Pregnancy

Men can take birth control shots to prevent pregnancy in their female partners, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Medicine

Channels:

Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Cancer, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Leukemia, Hematology, Antibody Therapy, AML

Antibody Breaks Leukemia’s Hold, Providing New Therapeutic Approach

reya_leukemia_bvs_spleen.jpg

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML. The study also shows that inhibiting CD98 with the therapeutic antibody IGN523 blocks AML growth in patient-derived cells and mouse models.

Medicine

Channels:

Celnik, Robert Hardwick, Robotic, game, Stroke, Brain

Researchers Use Video Gamelike Test to Study Learning and Recovery in Stroke Patients

Image1.jpg

A robotic arm and a virtual game were essential tools in a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine. The study results suggest that while training doesn't change neurological repair in chronic stroke patients, it can indeed help such patients learn new motor skills and achieve more independence in their daily lives.

Medicine

Channels:

Microbiome, Oral Health, Migraines, Bacteriology, Microbiology, Genetics, Cardiology, Dentistry, Neurobiology, Nitrates

Migraine Sufferers Have More Nitrate-Reducing Microbes in Their Mouths

mouth_pixabay.jpg

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have found that the mouths of migraine sufferers harbor significantly more microbes with the ability to modify nitrates than people who do not get migraine headaches. The study is published October 18 by mSystems.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Alcohol, Drunk Driving, Wearable Sensor, Smartphone, Perspiration, Sweat

Wearable Tattoo Sends Alcohol Levels to Your Cell Phone

Picture1.png

Engineers funded by NIBIB have developed a small device, worn on the skin, that detects alcohol levels in perspiration and sends the information to the uses smart phone in just 8 minutes. It was designed as a convenient method for individuals to monitor their alcohol intake.

Medicine

Channels:

virtual diagnoses, symptom checkers, online diagnosis, online symptom checkrs, diagnostic accuracy

Doc Versus Machine

Virtual-symptom-checker-350.jpg

Hundreds of millions of people rely on Internet or app-based symptom checkers to help make sense of symptoms or self-diagnose diseases. The first direct comparison shows human doctors outperform digital ones in diagnostic accuracy.







Chat now!