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Victor Velculescu, Cancer, fallopian tube

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Oct-2017 5:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Drug Reactions, African American, Genetics, Ancestry, Cancer

Genetics Study Reveals Reactions to Drugs Result in Poorer Outcomes for African American Breast Cancer Patients

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African American women participating in a clinical study on breast cancer had more side effects and poorer survival rates than did women of European ancestry, according to a an Indiana University study that identified ethnicity through genetics--a first in this type of research.

Medicine

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Cancer, Cancer Treatment, Cancer Prevention, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Advances, breast cancer and diet, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Breast Cancer Awareness, ER-negative breast cancer, ER-positive breast cancer, ER-positive tumors, Epigenetic, epigenetic alterations, Cancer and Diet, cancer and food, plant-based diet, Chemo Preventatives, Cruciferous

Plant-Based Diet Converts Breast Cancer in Mice From Lethal to Treatable Form

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Researchers use compounds found in a combination plant-based diet to successfully prevent and treat ER-negative breast cancer in mice.

Medicine

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Seizures, Epilelpsy, Glucosamine, N-Acetylglucosamine, O-GlcNAcylation , Hippocampus, Neural Hyperexcitability, Long-term synaptic depression

A Dietary Supplement Dampens the Brain Hyperexcitability Seen in Seizures or Epilepsy

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Inducing a biochemical alteration in brain proteins via the dietary supplement glucosamine was able to rapidly dampen that pathological hyperexcitability in rat and mouse models. These results represent a potentially novel therapeutic target for the treatment of seizure disorders

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Jadon and Anias McDonald, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, James Goodrich, Oren Tepper, conjoined twins separation

Thriving at Home: One Year After a Marathon Surgery to Separate Them, Formerly Conjoined Twins Jadon and Anias McDonald “Achieve New Milestones Every Day”

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October 14 marks one year since complete separation of Jadon and Anias McDonald at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore

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Science Signaling, Maternal Fetal Medicine, Pregnancy, Fever in pregnancy, Congenital Heart Defects, Congenital Malformations, Cleft Palate, cleft lip and palate, Cleft Lip, VSD, Heart Defects, Neonatology, Tetralogy of Fallot , Acetaminophen, Tylenol, first trimester

How Fever in Early Pregnancy Causes Heart, Facial Birth Defects

Researchers have known for decades that fevers in the first trimester of pregnancy increase risk for some heart defects and facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate. Exactly how this happens is unclear. Duke researchers now have evidence indicating that the fever itself, not its root source, is what interferes with the development of the heart and jaw during the first three to eight weeks of pregnancy.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, tau, TREM2

Alzheimer’s Gene Poses Both Risk — and Benefits

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Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the immune system’s ability to protect the brain from amyloid beta. The good news, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is that later in the disease, the absence of TREM2 protein seems to protect the brain from damage.

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Iowa State University, Food Science, Nutrition, Vegetable, oil, Fat, nutrient deficiency, Bioavailability, Salad, Salad Dressing, Vitamins, Health

A Spoonful of Oil: Research Finds Further Evidence That Fats and Oils Help to Unlock Full Nutritional Benefits of Veggies

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Some dressing with your greens may help you absorb more nutrients, according to a study from an Iowa State University scientist. The research found enhanced absorption of multiple fat-soluble vitamins in addition to beta-carotene and three other carotenoids. The study appeared recently in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and the results may ease the guilt of countless dieters who fret about adding dressing to their salads.

Medicine

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Healthcare Costs, Affordable Care Act (ACA), Low-Value Care, low-value services, high-volume healthcare services, fee-for-service Medicare, Medicare, Medicare advantage, Medicaid, private health insurance , out-of-pocket healthcare costs

Low-Cost, High-Volume Services Make Up Big Portion of Spending on Unneeded Health Care

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Low-cost, high-volume health services account for a high percentage of unnecessary health spending, adding strain to the health care system.

Medicine

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Dementia, frontotemporal degeneration, Caregivers, Healthcare Costs, Economic Burden, Healthcare, young onset dementia, Disability, Medical Costs, Medical Expenditures

Study Reveals Staggering Economic Burden of Dementia in Younger People

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While the social and economic cost of Alzheimer’s is well documented, a new study shows that frontotemporal degeneration (FTD)—the most common dementia for people under age 60—inflicts a significantly higher economic burden on both patients and their caregivers. It found that the average annual costs associated with FTD to total $119,654, nearly two times the reported annual cost of Alzheimer’s.







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