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Scientists Discover “Dimmer Switch” for Mood Disorders

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Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a control mechanism for an area of the brain that processes sensory and emotive information that humans experience as “disappointment.”

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New Insights on an Ancient Plague Could Improve Treatments for Infections

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Dangerous new pathogens such as the Ebola virus invoke scary scenarios of deadly epidemics, but even ancient scourges such as the bubonic plague are still providing researchers with new insights on how the body responds to infections.

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UNC Researchers Link Gene to Increased Dendritic Spines – a Signpost of Autism

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UNC scientists discover that knocking out the gene NrCAM increases the number of dendritic spines on excitatory pyramidal neurons. Other studies have confirmed that the overabundance of dendritic spines allows for too many synaptic connections – a phenomenon strongly linked to autism.

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Migraine in Middle Age Linked to Increased Risk of Parkinson’s, Movement Disorders Later

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson’s, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Vitiligo Treatment Holds Promise for Restoring Skin Pigmentation

A treatment regimen is safe and effective for restoring skin pigmentation in vitiligo patients, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study. “Our findings offer patients with vitiligo worldwide a renewed hope for a bright future in the treatment of this disfiguring disease,” says Henry Lim, M.D., chair of Dermatology at Henry Ford and the study’s lead author. “Patients with lesions on their face and arms could have a more rapid response to the combination treatment.”

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Gut Bacteria, Artificial Sweeteners, and Glucose Intolerance

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Artificial sweeteners have long been promoted as diet and health aids. But breaking research from the Weizmann Institute shows that these products may be leading to the very diseases they were said to help prevent: scientists have discovered that, after exposure to artificial sweeteners, our gut bacteria may be triggering harmful metabolic changes.

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Healthy Humans Make Nice Homes for Viruses

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The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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Slow to Mature, Quick to Distract: ADHD Brain Study Finds Slower Development of Key Connections

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A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.

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Schizophrenia Not a Single Disease but Multiple Genetically Distinct Disorders

New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is reported online Sept. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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