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How Do You Kill a Malaria Parasite? Clog It with Cholesterol

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Drexel scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two antimalarial drugs kill Plasmodium parasites. Amidst growing concerns about drug resistance, these findings could help to develop more effective drugs against the disease.

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Scientists Block Breast Cancer Cells From Hiding in Bones

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Scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a molecular key that breast cancer cells use to invade bone marrow in mice, where they may be protected from chemotherapy or hormonal therapies that could otherwise eradicate them.

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Zika Virus May Be Linked to More Eye Problems in Brazilian Babies with Microcephaly

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Researchers from Brazil and Stanford University report on an ocular case study of three Brazilian infants with microcephaly presumed to be caused by Zika virus. Findings will appear in Ophthalmology, journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

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Current Screening Methods Miss Worrisome Number of Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment

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In a paper published in the current Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System say existing screening tools for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) result in a false-negative error rate of more than 7 percent. These persons are misclassified as not having MCI based on standard screening instruments but actually do have MCI when more extensive testing is conducted.

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UCLA Study Identifies How Brain Connects Memories Across Time

UCLA neuroscientists have identified in mice how the brain links different memories over time. The findings suggest a possible intervention for people suffering from age-related memory problems.

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Extreme Preemies Disadvantaged in Employment, Income, Self-Esteem, Marriage and More by Their 30s

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Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies who survive are more likely to be disadvantaged in employment, income, self-esteem, marriage and more by the time they reach their 30s. A longitudinal study has followed the ELBW survivors born between 1977 and 1982.

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Low Salt Diets Not Beneficial: Global Study Finds

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A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption.

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Lab Cell Study Shows That HOXA5 Protein Acts as Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

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Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. Now, results of a new study by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists suggests a powerful role for the protein in normal breast cells, acting as a tumor suppressor that halts abnormal cell growth.

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Racial and Ethnic Differences Found in Psychiatric Diagnoses and Treatment, According to Researchers

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Non-Hispanic blacks are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, but they’re significantly less likely to receive medication for treatment, according to researchers.

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No Link Between Eating Dinner After 8 p.m. And Obesity in Children

Researchers at King's College London have found no significant link between eating the evening meal after 8pm and excess weight in children, according to a paper published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition.

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New Ultrasound Method Increases Awareness About Cancer Cells

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Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the United States have developed a method to analyse and separate cells from the blood. Ultimately, the method, which goes under the name iso-acoustic focusing, can become significant to measure the efficiency of cancer treatments for individuals.

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Exercise, More Than Diet, Key to Preventing Obesity

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Two factors—metabolism and gut microbes – have been credited by researchers as key players in the fight against obesity. However, there is an ongoing debate about whether exercise or diet better promotes metabolism and healthy shifts in gut microbes, the microscopic organisms in our intestines that break down food and can contribute to decreased obesity. New research from the University of Missouri confirms exercise plays a significant role in the fight against obesity.

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Regular Physical Activity is ‘Magic Bullet’ for Pandemics of Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease

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The statistics on regular physical activity in the U.S. are bleak; only about 20 percent of Americans engage in recommended levels of regular physical activity and about 64 percent never do any physical activity.

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Big Data Can Save Lives, Says Leading Queen’s University Cancer Expert

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The sharing of genetic information from millions of cancer patients around the world could be key to revolutionising cancer prevention and care, according to a leading cancer expert from Queen’s University Belfast.

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Review Finds Fathers’ Age, Lifestyle Associated with Birth Defects

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A growing body of research is revealing associations between birth defects and a father’s age, alcohol use and environmental factors, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. They say these defects result from epigenetic alterations that can potentially affect multiple generations.

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Chicken Coops, Sewage Treatment Plants Are Hot Spots of Antibiotic Resistance

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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria most often are associated with hospitals and other health-care settings, but a new study indicates that chicken coops and sewage treatment plants also are hot spots of antibiotic resistance.

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Mouse Models of Zika in Pregnancy Show How Fetuses Become Infected

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Two mouse models of Zika virus infection in pregnancy have been developed by a team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. In them, the virus migrated from the pregnant mouse’s bloodstream into the placenta and then to the brains of the developing pups.

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Common Antacid Linked to Accelerated Vascular Aging

Chronic use of some drugs for heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) speeds up the aging of blood vessels, according to a published paper in Circulation Research (early online), an American Heart Association journal. This accelerated aging in humans could lead to increased cardiovascular disease, vascular dementia and renal failure.

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How to Remove a Splinter

Everyone has been there. No sooner did you or your child touch that old wooden bench when a small sliver of wood slides into the skin – causing a surprising amount of pain. Fortunately, say dermatologists, splinters are easy to remove with the proper tools and technique.

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When You Take Acetaminophen, You Don’t Feel Others’ Pain as Much

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When you take acetaminophen to reduce your pain, you may also be decreasing your empathy for both the physical and social aches that other people experience, a new study suggests.