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Article ID: 708254

Temperatures Rising: Patients Taking Diuretics May See More Benefit by Upping Potassium Intake During Warmer Weather

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Patients taking diuretics are often at risk for low potassium levels, which can put patients at an increased risk of death from cardiac arrhythmias or other causes. But researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that taking prescription potassium supplements can reduce these patients’ risk by nearly 10 percent as daily outdoor temperatures increase—a time when patients may be at highest risk due to loss of potassium while sweating. These findings are detailed in a study published today in BMJ Open.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2019 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708198

Penn Medicine and CHOP Study Finds that Fetal Signaling Pathways May Offer Future Targets for Treating Lung Injury

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new animal study describes how cells that become alveoli, the tiny compartments in which gas exchange occurs in the lung, begin their specialized roles very early in prenatal life. Investigating the fetal signaling pathways active in this biological event may offer future opportunities to treat lung damage caused by prematurity and other lung injuries.

Released:
15-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708238

Hormone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk during gender transition

American Heart Association (AHA)

Patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their gender-transition treatment had an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, including strokes, heart attacks and blood clots, according to a study published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST

Article ID: 708237

Study Finds Low Statin Use Among Kidney Disease Patients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

Loyola University Health System

Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in kidney disease patients who are not on dialysis. But a new study finds that statins are used by only 21.8 percent such patients who do not already have cardiovascular disease or diabetes or have not been diagnosed with high cholesterol.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708215

Does a severe infection put you at greater risk of heart disease and death?

University of Alabama at Birmingham

As part of the study, researchers conducted a population-based assessment of incident cardiovascular events occurring in patients with severe sepsis, and the effect of these cardiovascular events on in-hospital mortality.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Embargo will expire:
21-Feb-2019 6:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
18-Feb-2019 6:00 AM EST

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Article ID: 708163

Blood clot discovery could pave way for treatment of blood diseases

University of Exeter

Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke and vascular dementia.

Released:
15-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 708149

Weight Cycling Does Not Adversely Affect Cardiovascular Outcomes in Women with Suspected Myocardial Ischemia

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Study suggests that weight loss, even if associated with intermittent weight gain, is worthwhile in that there appears to be no harm and possible benefit in terms of cardiovascular outcomes.

Released:
15-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Feb-2019 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 707952

OSA Patients with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness at Greatest Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive sleepiness while awake appear to be at far greater risk for cardiovascular diseases than those without excessive daytime sleepiness, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Released:
12-Feb-2019 4:00 PM EST

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