Curated News: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Filters close
Newswise: A novel, powerful tool to unveil the communication between gut microbes and the brain
Released: 13-Jan-2023 4:50 PM EST
A novel, powerful tool to unveil the communication between gut microbes and the brain
Baylor College of Medicine

In the past decade, researchers have begun to appreciate the importance of a two-way communication that occurs between microbes in the gastrointestinal tract and the brain, known as the gut–brain axis.

Newswise: Study reveals obesity-related trigger that can lead to diabetes
10-Jan-2023 2:00 PM EST
Study reveals obesity-related trigger that can lead to diabetes
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a defect in an enzyme called APT1 interferes with the ability to secrete insulin, contributing to the development of Type 2 diabetes in people who are overweight or obese.

Newswise: Dry eye disease alters how the eye’s cornea heals itself after injury
29-Dec-2022 3:15 PM EST
Dry eye disease alters how the eye’s cornea heals itself after injury
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that proteins made by stem cells to help regenerate the cornea may become new targets for treating and preventing injuries to the cornea related to dry eye disease. When eyes are dry, the cornea is more susceptible to injury.

Released: 15-Dec-2022 4:55 PM EST
Problems with Alcohol Increase After Weight-Loss Surgery in Adolescence
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Youth who underwent metabolic and bariatric surgery as teenagers are at heightened risk for alcohol use, according to the first study to document long-term alcohol use and associated issues in this population. Researchers found that after eight years, nearly half of study participants had alcohol use disorders, symptoms of alcohol-related harm, or alcohol-related problems. Results were published in the journal Annals of Surgery.

5-Dec-2022 10:05 PM EST
Racial, ethnic, socioeconomic disparities in insulin pump use have persisted over 20 years
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

While use of insulin pumps to manage type 1 diabetes has grown over 20 years, there has been no improvement in racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in their use.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 11:00 AM EST
Organ Donations, Transplants Increase on Days of Largest Motorcycle Rallies
Harvard Medical School

Analysis shows steep increases in organ donations, transplantations during large motorcycle rallies. The increase in organ donations and transplantations appears to be driven by well-documented increases in crash-related deaths during large motorcycle rallies.

Newswise: Study: Which People With Chronic Pancreatitis Will Develop Diabetes?
Released: 16-Nov-2022 12:05 PM EST
Study: Which People With Chronic Pancreatitis Will Develop Diabetes?
Cedars-Sinai

A new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators describes risk factors that could make it more likely for people who have chronic pancreatitis, an ongoing inflammation of the pancreas, to develop diabetes. The findings are published in Diabetes Care.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:20 AM EST
Holding Mycophenolate Mofetil for 10 Days or More May Improve COVID-19 Vaccine Response
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated that withholding mycophenolate mofetil for 10 days significantly increased antibody response after 2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, without a significant increase in flares.

3-Nov-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Protected From a Form of Cell Death, Women are More Resilient to Kidney Disease
Duke Health

In the battle of the sexes, women beat men in their ability to recover from kidney injury, but the reasons are not well understood. A study led by Duke Health researchers provides some insights: Females, it turns out, have an advantage at the molecular level that protects them from a form of cell death that occurs in injured kidneys. This protection could be exploited as a potential therapeutic.

Newswise: Study: First-Degree Relatives of Patients with NAFLD at Risk of Liver Disease
Released: 1-Nov-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Study: First-Degree Relatives of Patients with NAFLD at Risk of Liver Disease
UC San Diego Health

New study identifies that first-degree relatives of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with advanced fibrosis (scarring of the liver) are at a 15% risk of developing the condition.

Released: 12-Oct-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Bionic Pancreas Improves Type 1 Diabetes Management in Kids and Adults
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A device known as a bionic pancreas, which uses next-generation technology to automatically deliver insulin, was more effective at maintaining blood glucose (sugar) levels within normal range than standard-of-care management among people with type 1 diabetes, a new multicenter clinical trial has found.

Newswise: Study Highlights Importance of Long-term Management of Hypertension
Released: 12-Oct-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study Highlights Importance of Long-term Management of Hypertension
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

In 2015, published findings from the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) showed that intensive blood pressure management reduced cardiovascular disease and lowered the risk of death. In 2019, results of the SPRINT MIND trial showed that lowering blood pressure also reduced the risk of mild cognitive impairment in older adults. Now, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine have shown that while intensive blood pressure control was beneficial to SPRINT participants’ health during the trial, the benefits for cardiovascular mortality went away after approximately two years when protocols for blood pressure management were no longer being followed.

Released: 29-Sep-2022 10:50 AM EDT
Lipids in blood predict nerve damage risk among patients with type 2 diabetes
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Multiple lipid biomarkers are linked to the development of neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds. Participants with high scores for diabetic neuropathy had changes in lipids reflecting impaired energy metabolism. Researchers say the findings bring potential to identify those with the highest risk of developing disease and facilitate more focused management.

Released: 23-Sep-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Intestinal fortitude: gut coils hold secrets of organ formation
Cornell University

Our guts, and all our organs, are arranged in left-right asymmetric patterns inside our bodies, so that everything may fit.

Released: 25-Aug-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Tufts University Scientists Identify Brain Pathway Connected to Hunger and Overeating
Tufts University

Scientists at Tufts University have discovered a pathway through which communications are regulated in the brain, and a misfire in the messaging can result in overeating, slower burning of calories, and other metabolic problems linked to obesity.

   
Released: 16-Aug-2022 10:10 AM EDT
Study Finds Undiagnosed Diabetes in U.S. Less Than Half of Current Estimates
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Analysis suggests undiagnosed diabetes is more prevalent in certain subgroups, including older and obese adults, racial/ethnic minorities, and those without health care access.

Newswise: Common Prebiotic Fiber Mitigates Harm of High-salt Diet in Rats
23-Jun-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Common Prebiotic Fiber Mitigates Harm of High-salt Diet in Rats
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research in rats finds a diet high in the fiber inulin offered a protective effect against the damage of a high-salt diet. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference

Newswise: Pediatric Liver Disease Increases Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes
Released: 13-Jun-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Pediatric Liver Disease Increases Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers describe connection between pediatric liver disease and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Both rates are rising in children.

Released: 25-Apr-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Controlling blood sugar may improve response to exercise training, study finds
Beth Israel Lahey Health

Scientists sought to determine whether high blood glucose blunts the body’s response to exercise and whether lowering it can restore the ability to improve aerobic capacity with training.

Released: 25-Apr-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Joslin Diabetes Center Receives $8.5 Million for NIH/NIDDK-Sponsored Diabetes Research Center (DRC) Program
Beth Israel Lahey Health

Joslin Diabetes Center, the preeminent institution for diabetes research and care, affiliated with Harvard Medical School and a part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, has again been awarded $8.5 million from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK) in continued support for Joslin’s Diabetes Research Center (DRC) program. The grant, which officially began April 1, 2022, marks the 36th continuous year of NIH investment in Joslin’s DRC.

Released: 18-Apr-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Study: Black Kidney Transplant Patients Exhibit Faster Clearance Rates of Key Immunosuppressive Medicine Tacrolimus
University at Buffalo

Black kidney transplant recipients have a faster clearance rate of the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus than white recipients, according to a new study led by the University at Buffalo. The study, published earlier this year in Pharmacotherapy, is one of the first to examine how both race and sex influence tacrolimus pharmacokinetics.

Newswise: SLU Physician-Scientist Awarded $428,020 NIH Grant to Study Short Bowel Syndrome
Released: 16-Mar-2022 2:35 PM EDT
SLU Physician-Scientist Awarded $428,020 NIH Grant to Study Short Bowel Syndrome
Saint Louis University

Ajay Jain, M.D., professor of pediatrics, pharmacology, and physiology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, has received funding from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study Short Bowel syndrome (SBS).

Released: 16-Mar-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Research team provides guidelines, recommendations for intermittent fasting
University of Illinois Chicago

A University of Illinois Chicago team has summarized research on intermittent fasting to provide insights into its effects on the body and to provide advice for incorporating these diets in everyday life. They have also presented recommendations for future research into these popular diet methods. “Clinical application of intermittent fasting for weight loss: progress and future directions,” was recently published in Nature Reviews Endocrinology.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Says Improvements Needed in Care for People with Prediabetes
Released: 3-Mar-2022 1:30 PM EST
Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Says Improvements Needed in Care for People with Prediabetes
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers analyzed electronic health records and insurance claims data to better understand patients with prediabetes in the Johns Hopkins Health System, and then used that information to recommend improvements in prediabetes care applicable to all medical institutions.

Released: 22-Feb-2022 1:10 PM EST
Obesity: What does immunity got to do with it?
Boston University School of Medicine

As organisms grow, older cells can undergo a phenomenon called senescence. This process defines a cell state where cells permanently stop dividing but do not die. Senescent cells secrete toxic pro-inflammatory factors contributing to the development of many diseases.

Newswise: New Research May Pave Way to Better Treatments for Crohn’s Disease
Released: 9-Feb-2022 1:40 PM EST
New Research May Pave Way to Better Treatments for Crohn’s Disease
Stony Brook University

A paper published this week in the journal Immunity lays the groundwork to better understand and treat Crohn’s disease. The research identified a new role for Interleukin-17A (IL-17A), an immune cell-derived cytokine, in promoting selective epithelial cell development and limiting inflammation during colitis.

Released: 2-Feb-2022 12:30 PM EST
Study finds concerning variations in care between physicians of the same specialty and in the same city, delivering care in the same clinical scenarios
Harvard Medical School

Some physicians are much more likely to deliver appropriate care than others, even in clinical situations where guidelines for appropriate care are clear. Notable—at times dramatic—differences were found across 14 common clinical scenarios representing seven specialties. The findings highlight the importance of understanding the reasons for these variations and developing ways to minimize them to improve the value of care.

Newswise: Clinical trial to study if mindfulness helps with diabetes-related stress, health
Released: 1-Dec-2021 10:05 AM EST
Clinical trial to study if mindfulness helps with diabetes-related stress, health
Penn State College of Medicine

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine are seeking volunteers from across the U.S. to participate in a clinical trial examining whether online mindfulness-based stress reduction can reduce stress and average blood sugar levels in those with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.

Newswise: 8136_ariana_chao_560x380.rev.1538748047.png
Released: 15-Nov-2021 11:20 AM EST
Exploring Psychological Resiliency of Older Adults with Diabetes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Studies suggest that exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with a variety of different mental health consequences including reports of depression, loneliness, and insomnia. People who are more than 65 years of age and those with underlying medical conditions such as type 2 diabetes and obesity are particularly vulnerable to negative outcomes from COVID-19. Until now, few investigations have identified and separated the mental health consequences of exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic from preexisting factors in this age group. A new prospective study of a large cohort of older adults with type 2 diabetes and overweight/obesity from across the U.S. has explored this subject with surprising results.

Released: 28-Oct-2021 5:25 PM EDT
A ‘Dented’ Internal Clock Provides Insight Into Shift Workers’ Weight Gain and Diabetes
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Weight gain and high blood sugar caused by a damaged internal clock was corrected by researchers, who changed the length of the “day” in mice

Newswise: 102921-TN-diabetes-study-square2.jpg
Released: 28-Oct-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Personalized medicine research focuses on Hispanics with diabetes in South Texas
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A team of researchers studying genetic data to identify hormone responses in a population of Mexican Americans with prediabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and obesity recently received a $3.5 million grant to fund a five-year study set to begin in late 2021.

20-Sep-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Intermittent fasting can help manage metabolic disease
Endocrine Society

Eating your daily calories within a consistent window of 8-10 hours is a powerful strategy to prevent and manage chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society’s journal, Endocrine Reviews.

Released: 22-Sep-2021 8:20 AM EDT
American Society of Nephrology and 19 Kidney Community Organizations Call on Congress to Protect Living Donors, Fund Research and Innovation, and Remove Barriers to Telehealth
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

Today, advocates of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and 19 other kidney health professional and patient organizations are meeting with their congressional delegations, calling on them to enact policies to improve kidney health

Newswise: Find Mothers’ Diabetes May Induce Premature Aging of Neural Tissue in Early Development of Fetuses, Leading to Birth Defects
Released: 9-Sep-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Find Mothers’ Diabetes May Induce Premature Aging of Neural Tissue in Early Development of Fetuses, Leading to Birth Defects
University of Maryland School of Medicine

About 300,000 to 400,000 fetuses per year from mothers with diabetes develop neural tube defects—when the tissue that eventually forms the brain and spinal cord fails to form properly—which can lead to miscarriage or profound disability.

Newswise: gut%20microbiome%20illustration_500x500.jpg
Released: 8-Sep-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Making the microbiome more amenable to cancer immunotherapy
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

The gut microbiome can impact us in a variety of different ways, from our metabolism to our mood. Now, NIBIB-funded researchers are investigating if a fiber-based gel can restore beneficial microbes in the gut to enhance the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors, a type of cancer immunotherapy treatment, in mice.

   
31-Aug-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Rheumatoid arthritis treated with implanted cells that release drug
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation.

Released: 24-Aug-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Radiation Therapy Effectiveness for Cancer Patients Influenced by Gut Fungi
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai Cancer researchers have discovered that intestinal microorganisms help regulate anti-tumor immune responses to radiation treatments, and that fungi and bacteria have opposing effects on those responses.

Released: 19-Aug-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Skipping Simple Urine Test Leaves High-Risk Groups With Untreated Kidney Disease
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Despite their higher risk of chronic kidney disease, people with hypertension or diabetes usually are not given a simple test for protein in the urine to screen for this potentially deadly disorder.

Released: 13-Aug-2021 1:20 PM EDT
UCI researchers find vital enzyme holds key to the fight against cancer and viral infections
University of California, Irvine

A new study led by University of California, Irvine (UCI) researchers identifies two ways in which APOBEC3A— a vital enzyme that is responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers while protecting our cells against viral infection—is controlled.

Released: 30-Jul-2021 12:15 PM EDT
UT Southwestern Finds Crucial New Molecular Mechanisms And Biomarkers in Ovarian Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 30, 2021 – UT Southwestern faculty have discovered what appears to be an Achilles’ heel in ovarian cancers, as well as new biomarkers that could point to which patients are the best candidates for possible new treatments.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Wayne State Researcher Secures $2.3 Million in NIH Funding for Metabolic Research
Wayne State University Division of Research

A Wayne State University School of Medicine researcher has been awarded a $2.3 million grant by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health, to support research in circadian RNA modification in metabolic disease.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 5:15 PM EDT
For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they believe that, for the first time, there is evidence to show that three doses of vaccine increase antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — more than the standard two-dose regimen for people who have received solid organ transplants.

20-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Vast under-treatment of diabetes seen in global study
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly half a billion people have diabetes, but only 1 in 10 of those in low- and middle-income countries are getting the kind of care that could make their lives healthier, longer and more productive, according to a new global study of data. Many don’t even know they have the condition.

Released: 19-May-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Final results of SPRINT study confirm controlling blood pressure critically important in preventing heart disease and stroke
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

News release about the follow-up data from the landmark SPRINT study of the effect of high blood pressure on cardiovascular disease have confirmed that aggressive blood pressure management — lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg -- dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death from these diseases, as well as death from all causes, compared to lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mm Hg.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Anemia Discovery Points to More Effective Treatment Approaches
University of Virginia Health System

A combination of inexpensive oral medications may be able to treat fatigue-inducing anemias caused by chronic diseases and inflammation, a new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

20-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Anti-Aging Compound Improves Muscle Glucose Metabolism in People
Washington University in St. Louis

In the first clinical trial of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the compound previously demonstrated to counteract aspects of aging and improve metabolic health in mice also has clinically relevant effects in people.

26-Mar-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Preventive treatment reduces diabetic retinopathy complications
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Early treatment with anti-VEGF injections slowed diabetic retinopathy in a clinical study from the DRCR Retina Network (DRCR.net). However, two years into the four-year study its effect on vision was similar to standard treatment, which usually begins at the onset of late disease.

11-Mar-2021 3:55 PM EST
Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey previously identified a small protein called Rab1A that regulates amino acid signaling. In a recent study, researchers explored the physiological role of Rab1A in mammals using mice though a technique in which one of an organism's genes is made inoperative, known as genetic knockout.

10-Mar-2021 2:05 PM EST
Intensive Lifestyle Intervention Is Beneficial for Most People with Type 2 Diabetes, But Not All
Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist

For people who are overweight or obese and have type 2 diabetes, the first line of treatment is usually lifestyle intervention, including weight loss and increased physical activity. While this approach has cardiovascular benefit for many, it can be detrimental for people who have poor blood sugar control, according to a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 2:00 PM EST
Swapping Alpha Cells For Beta Cells to Treat Diabetes
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Blocking cell receptors for glucagon, the counter-hormone to insulin, cured mouse models of diabetes by converting glucagon-producing cells into insulin producers instead, a team led by UT Southwestern reports in a new study. The findings, published online in PNAS, could offer a new way to treat both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in people.


Showing results

150 of 91

close
0.68426