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110 of 2016
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2018 7:05 PM EST

Article ID: 689846

Brain Size of Human Ancestors Evolved Gradually Over 3 Million Years

University of Chicago Medical Center

Modern humans have brains that are more than three times larger than our closest living relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos. Scientists don't agree on when and how this dramatic increase took place, but new analysis of 94 hominin fossils shows that average brain size increased gradually and consistently over the past three million years.

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20-Feb-2018 1:45 PM EST
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Archaeology and Anthropology, Evolution and Darwin, Paleontology, Featured: SciWire, Local - Illinois, All Journal News, Staff Picks

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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Feb-2018 7:00 PM EST

Article ID: 689752

Astronomers Reveal Secrets of Most Distant Supernova Ever Detected

University of Southampton

An international team of astronomers led by the University of Southampton has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected – a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.

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19-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 688847

Even Small Changes Within an Ecosystem Can Have Detrimental Effects

Binghamton University, State University of New York

A mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants.

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1-Feb-2018 3:40 PM EST
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Article ID: 688774

Coastal Water Absorbing More Carbon Dioxide

University of Delaware

New research by the University of Delaware and other institutions reveals that water over continental shelves is shouldering more atmospheric carbon dioxide, which may have implications for scientists studying how much carbon dioxide can be released into the atmosphere while keeping warming limited.

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31-Jan-2018 4:55 PM EST
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Climate Science, Environmental Science, Marine Science, Featured: SciWire, All Journal News, Staff Picks, Nature (journal)

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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688510

Mammals Moving Less in Human Landscapes May Upset Ecology

Stony Brook University

Could baboons and other mammals worldwide soon need pedometers? Not likely, but a new study to be published in Science reveals that on average, mammals move distances two to three times shorter in human-modified landscapes than they do in the wild.

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25-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Agriculture, All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Environmental Science, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro, Climate Science, Wildlife, Featured: SciWire, Staff Picks

  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688233

Tiny Particles Have Outsize Impact on Storm Clouds, Precipitation

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Tiny particles fuel powerful storms and influence weather much more than has been appreciated, according to a study in the Jan. 26 issue of the journal Science. The tiny pollutants – long considered too small to have much impact on droplet formation – are, in effect, diminutive downpour-makers.

Released:
22-Jan-2018 9:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Pollution, DOE Science News, Energy, Featured: SciWire, Staff Picks

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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688358

A New 'Atmospheric Disequilibrium' Could Help Detect Life on Other Planets

University of Washington

A University of Washington study has found a simple approach to look for life that might be more promising than just looking for oxygen.

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23-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688081

Climate Change and Snowmelt - Turn Up the Heat, but What About Humidity?

University of Utah

changes in humidity may determine how the contribution of snowpack to streams, lakes and groundwater changes as the climate warms. Surprisingly, cloudy, gray and humid winter days can actually cause the snowpack to warm faster, increasing the likelihood of melt during winter months when the snowpack should be growing, the authors report. In contrast, under clear skies and low humidity the snow can become colder than the air, preserving the snowpack until spring.

Released:
17-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST
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Climate Science, Environmental Science, Featured: SciWire, PNAS, All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Staff Picks

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 687721

Ingredients for Life Revealed in Meteorites That Fell to Earth

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A detailed study of blue salt crystals found in two meteorites that crashed to Earth – which included X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab – found that they contain both liquid water and a mix of complex organic compounds including hydrocarbons and amino acids.

Released:
9-Jan-2018 5:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Chemistry, Energy, Particle Physics, Physics, Space, DOE Science News, Local - California, Featured: SciWire, Staff Picks

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Article ID: 687701

New Discovery Could Improve Brain-Like Memory and Computing

University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A new discovery, led by researchers at the University of Minnesota, demonstrates the existence of a new kind of magnetoresistance involving topological insulators that could result in improvements in future computing and computer storage.

Released:
9-Jan-2018 2:55 PM EST
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110 of 2016





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