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Article ID: 707961

Time for a talk about vaping?

UT Southwestern Medical Center

With new findings that show an unprecedented jump in nicotine-containing electronic cigarette usage among teens, many parents wonder how best to approach the topic.

Released:
12-Feb-2019 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 707935

Paying Low-Income Smokers to Quit? New Study Shows Financial Incentives for Tobacco Quit Phone Line Engagement Are Cost-Effective

ISPOR—The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research

Value in Health, the official journal of ISPOR, announced the publication of new research showing that the use of financial incentives to encourage engagement with tobacco quit line treatment is a cost-effective option to enhance smoking cessation rates for low-income smokers.

Released:
12-Feb-2019 8:15 AM EST

Article ID: 707410

Common e-cigarette chemical flavorings may impair lung function

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Two chemicals widely used to flavor electronic cigarettes may be impairing the function of cilia in the human airway, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Released:
1-Feb-2019 1:05 PM EST

Article ID: 707081

Rutgers Researchers Highlight Need for More Smoking Cessation Programs in State Prisons

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Inmates want to quit smoking but don’t have access to smoking cessation programs in state prisons, increasing the risk – especially among black male inmates -- of cancer, heart disease, stroke and other smoking-related diseases, according to Rutgers researchers.

Released:
28-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706835

Embargoed AJPH research: Police-related deaths, homicide in Mexico, tobacco use in young adults, 1970s heroin intervention

American Public Health Association (APHA)

In this issue, find research on police-related deaths, homocide in Mexico and life expectancy, tobacco and polytobacco use in young adults, and a 1970s heroin intervention

Released:
22-Jan-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 706967

Exploring Targeted Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey researcher Sharon R. Pine, PhD, has received a $200,000 Lung Cancer Discovery Award from the American Lung Association to examine potential new treatment options for patients with a sub-type of non-small cell lung cancer.

Released:
24-Jan-2019 12:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 706905

Northwest Hospital Earns National Recognition as Maryland’s First Hospital with Completely Smoke-Free Operating Rooms

LifeBridge Health

Did you know that some instruments used during operations can produce smoke that is hazardous to surgical teams and patients? Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Maryland decided it was time to do something about the situation.

Released:
22-Jan-2019 6:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706476

Heart disease risk begins in the womb

PLOS

Heart disease is the greatest killer in the world today, and it is widely accepted that our genes interact with traditional lifestyle risk factors, such as smoking, obesity and/or a sedentary life to promote an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a new study in sheep, publishing January 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by a team from Cambridge University, finds that offspring whose mothers had a complicated pregnancy may be at greater risk of heart disease in later life, suggesting that our cards may be marked even before we are born.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 8:05 AM EST

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